Jim Carter's Old Chevy Trucks - Classic Chevy & GMC Truck Parts for all of your restoration needs! 1000's of parts in stock now!

Posts Tagged ‘1942’

1942 Chevrolet ½ Ton

Friday, February 2nd, 2018

Owner: Bill Sanders

1942 Chevrolet ½ Ton

Buy Parts Now @ Jim Carter's OldChevyTrucks.com

If you like the 70 year old body designs with the “creature comforts” of a modern vehicle, our feature truck this month might really catch you attention. It may appear very old but on a freeway it can reach a speed far above the legal limits!

This eye catching stand out in a crowd 1942 Chevy pickup is owned by Bill Sanders of Crossville, Tennessee. What a creation!  After 2 ½ years of building it has just been on the road only a month to check for little problems that need corrections.  So far, nothing has shown up that cannot be easily repaired.

Bill has been involved in other vehicle restorations but this is the first time using a late model drive train. His brother had stored this cab, bed, and front sheet metal for many years with no steps taken to restore it.  So, one day, Bill got the opportunity to buy it.  It was soon brought to his home but in pieces.  No frame or related suspension, motor, transmission or differential.  So what now?  Either gather original parts and create a “frame off” original or do what he has sometimes seen at local car shows.

A VINTAGE LOOK WITH LATE MODEL MECHANICALS

After much research and talking to others. Bill’s discovered a US Company that manufactures conversion kits designed to attach a 1939-46 Chevrolet ½ ton body to a Chevy S-10 pickup chassis. Why an S-10?

They are almost the correct wheel base as Bills 1942 and have a full frame to secure the older sheet metal and extra weight that may be hauled. S-10’s have repair parts readily available and they come from the factory with options like automatic transmission, independent front suspension, power steering, power brakes and air conditioning.

The company “Code 504” will even get involved to help you adapt your S-10 Chassis to hold a late model Chevrolet V-8 or most any tech question during the installation.

Bill was hooked! This is what he wanted.  A good friend with experience in this type work was retired but decided being off work was not for him.   Bill found him at just the right time.  Thus, John Leech, also of Crossville, Tennessee and Bill Sanders became partners.

Together Bill and John with 2 ½ years created the finished product. John did the chassis rebuilding on a 1979 S-10, adding the “Code 504” kit, and restored much of the 1942 body.  Bill says he became John’s assistant.  John’s so many years in mechanical repair business made him a natural on what needed to be done.

The easy part was replacing the worn out ½ ton bed. Fortunately, all bed parts are available and they fit and took just like the originals.  No repair panels required.  Mostly a light sanding, paint and the detailed assembly was needed.

The 1942 sheet metal was another story. It had been so abused over the many years!  Few, items are being reproduced and it became a hunt to locate better used replacement parts.  Thank goodness for John Leech!

The updated modern mechanicals from the radiator to the differential were not difficult to obtain. You just need some deep money pockets to take position and then get them to all line up together.

A few of the major items were a 350 Chevy V-8, 400 turbo transmission, (both from a 1975 Corvette) GM power steering and brakes, air conditioning, plus tilt steering column. Of course, the extra chrome and polished aluminum made the engine compartment a real standout.

Owners of special interest older vehicles are never completely done. Bill has some ideas that may take place in the future.

For sure, he plans on this to be a tribute to US Army Special Forces that include:

Delta Force * Green Berets * Army Rangers
(Bill’s son-in-law is a Green Beret and this had made a deep impression on his feelings for our US military).

He might even install an exact copy of a 50 caliber machine gun and mount it in the bed for local parades. What a parade eye catcher!  A non-military vehicle with a large machine gun!

Bill is even thinking of calling it his Hillbilly Humvee.

Special bed side boards will announce this fact during parades!

You can contact Bill at wildbillsanders@comcast.net.

1942 Chevrolet ½ Ton

Coming down the road

Side View

Nice Bed – Small Tubs Required

Satin Sheen in Red

View from a step ladder

Centerline 5 bolt wheels

Extra Bright work is just right

The kit installed on a restored chassis ”before the body”.

The Proud Owner, Bill Sanders

1936-1942 Coupe Pick Up

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1936-1942 Chevy Coupe Pick Up

During the great depression of the 1930’s, almost half of the automakers ceased business forever. Most remaining manufacturers modified their vehicles and advertising techniques to appeal to a very conservative buyer. With limited disposable income the few people willing to purchase a car or truck were very careful.

To help boost or at least hold sales steady, the Chevrolet Division introduced a new model in 1936. It was referred to as the Coupe Pickup. With a small corporate investment a dual purpose vehicle was created to appeal to the buyer with a need for both a car and a pickup.

The new model was a standard coupe with a miniature pickup truck bed placed in the trunk area. This small new bed included wood planks, metal strips, sides, and tailgate much like larger ½ ton pickups. It extended out of the trunk about the distance of the rear bumper. To keep out dust and rain water, a custom made canvas snapped in place between the small bed sides and the coupe trunk edges.

To appeal to the conservative new car buyer during the depression years this vehicle even included a painted coupe deck lid wrapped in several coverings of butcher paper. In this way if the mini-bed was removed, the deck lid could be attached and the owner then had a car.

A popular use was by neighborhood grocery stores.  The coupe express was excellent to deliver grocery items in the neighborhood.  The owner could also use it as his personal car!

This unique model was available each year from 1936 through early 1942 when World War II stopped domestic car production. There is almost no survival of the original coupe pickups. The few that made it even to the 1950’s were almost always given their deck lid to transform them to a pure coupe. Few people wanted an older pickup with such limited hauling capacity when they could have a coupe with a somewhat youthful sporty appearance.

No doubt the major weakness of this model was the canvas between the bed and body. It soon deteriorated when the vehicle set outside leaving the trunk area exposed to rain and snow. This was just the beginning of major rust problems which in time totaled the trunk area and maybe even the complete vehicle!

Today, if one of these beds would appear at an antique auto swap meet, almost no one would remember it’s original application. When the Chevrolet lettering was not on the gate, most would pass by thinking it is probably home made for a forgotten use.

1936-1942 coupe puick up 1

1936-1942 coupe pick up 2

1936-1942 coupe pick up

1936-1942 coupe pick up

Below is an example of an excellent used insert that made the standard coupe a coupe express. Found in Montana in 2013, it is about as pure as one can find of an almost 75 year old Chevrolet accessory. Almost no rust damage and some original paint! It had to be placed in a storage building when the car was made back into a standard coupe.

1942 Chevrolet Deland Fire Truck

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Our 1942 1 1/2 ton Chevrolet Fire Truck Was delivered to the DeLand Naval Air Station, February, 1942.

Served during WW II as the crash truck during navy pilot training. When the war was over, it was given to the City of DeLand, Florida. It was painted OD green and had about 3,000 miles on the odometer. It ran as a first line truck for City for many years and then was parked at the airport in a an old hanger. It was in pretty bad shape by the time I got evolved. We raised money to have it restored by the auto shop at the local State Prison. They did a beautiful job and is now used in public relations and giving local children rides during the Christmas parade and during the annual Veteran’s Day Parade. The mileage today just topped 11,000 miles. The engine has NEVER been apart and runs just about as well as it did when issued. The system has been converted over to 12 volts. The fire department has maintained ownership and we all try to keep up with the overall maintenance.

After the great fire storm of 1998, my wife and I were invited to the Daytona International Speedway to participate in the appreciation day and make a blazing lap round the 2.5 mile track at 40 MPH.

Thanks for looking.
Dave Sutherland / Captain
City of DeLand Fire Department
n4gmu@bellsouth.net.

1942 Chevrolet Deland Fire Truck 1

1942 Chevrolet Deland Fire Truck 2

d1942 Chevrolet Deland Fire Truck 3

WWII Cab Changes

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

With the US entry into World War II, trucks were quickly modified to be successful for military use. Pre-existing cabs, frames, and mechanical components were altered to be more usable when in everyday work duties or in battle.  NOTE:  The Chevrolet cab remains almost the same as those on civilian trucks.

WWII Cab 1
This photo shows a large military truck that was built by the Chevrolet Division of General Motors about 1941.  The items of much interest are the changes made for use overseas and when the truck was in the field.

WWII Cab 2

The horn button is of a very heavy duty basic design, not like on most civilian trucks.  Only the civilian ‘cab-over-engine’ body carried this style horn button on non-military vehicles.

WWII Cab3

Note: This is a civilian Chevrolet cab with many modifications. The windshield frame is operated differently. Its hinges are on the outside for easy repair. There is no crank-out assembly that is known for their short life. The frame is opened manually much like the trucks before 1936. The crank handle hole is not even punched in the dash panel.

WWII Cab 5

The crank handle hole is not punched in the dash panel.  The windshield frame is secured in the closed position by a simple wedge handle.

WWII Cab 6

The cab rear window is well protected with an exterior steel grill. We suspect many private owners would have liked this extra on their domestic trucks.

WWII Cab 6

The inside door and window handles are not die-cast due to the war time shortage of zinc. They are made of a steel stamping covered with a dull Bakelite molded material. This usually shrinks and cracks within a few years.

WWII Cab 7

The removable hood side panels are of extra thickness to protect the engine from enemy rifle fire.  The Chevrolet lettering was removed after 1941 to stop extra advertising.

WWII Cab 9

The windshield and hood have exterior hinges for easy accessibility if damaged overseas.