Jim Carter's Old Chevy Trucks - Classic Chevy & GMC Truck Parts for all of your restoration needs! 1000's of parts in stocks now!

Posts Tagged ‘1955’

Suburban Rear Quarter Panel Holes

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

The full rear quarter panels for the 1947-55 Chevy/GMC Suburban were made all the same at the metal stamping manufacturer.  To save money these panels were not made different if the Suburban was to have the double doors or the tailgate style opening in the rear.

Thus, when the Suburban was provided with a lift and tailgate combination the 4 holes for the “double barn door” hinges in the quarter panels were filled with rectangular rubber plugs.  This was not just for appearance but prevent rain water from reaching the body interior.

These photos show the plugs painted in body color; however it is questioned if this is correct.  By 1950, Suburban buyers had the choice of the 12 pickup colors.  It would have been more economical for all to have black rubber plugs instead of 12 boxes with the optional color prepainted plugs on the assembly line.

The other thought:  These plugs were painted when the full body was given its final color.  This would mean GM planned on the enamel body paint being of the quality that would successfully adhere to rubber over the years.  We don’t usually see this combination in other GM vehicles.  Special paint for rubber only is used!

Comments on how it really occurred:  Email us at jcarter@oldchevytrucks.com

1947-1955 GM panel truck seats

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

Attached are some pictures of the correct 1947-1955 GM panel truck seats. The right side was a factory option. This would be special ordered if the owner was planning on two passengers. Though they have been recovered with cloth instead of factory “leatherette”, they are correct in all other ways. What is interesting is how GM made the optional right side seat to fold up against the dash. This was necessary to allow easier access to merchandise up front. No need to unload freight to get to the front storage area. It appears the seat frame and floor is painted the original grey color. A thin sheet of insulation is placed between each of the body supports. This was to lessen road noise and slow some heat from entering the cab on hot days. Another interesting feature on panel trucks; the single horizontal oak board on each side of the interior helps prevent damage to the exterior sheet metal walls. If a stack of transported items tipped while the panel truck was making a corner, there was less chance of dents being placed on the sides. Note the long metal lid over the floor box which is under the factory optional right seat. This is only provided in the panel truck and canopy express bodies.  It kept the driver’s papers in a neat compartment so they did not slide or blow across the floor.

1947-1955 GM panel truck seats 1947-1955 GM panel truck seats

1947-55 Suburban/Canopy Express Tail Light

Monday, June 25th, 2012

What an ingenious way to keep a tail light in view! General Motors realized that with the tail gate in the lowered position the center tail light still had to be seen by the following traffic. At times the gate will stay lowered when longer freight is carried.

Therefore, the 5” round light is attached to a swing bracket. This bracket is moved by a ¼” vertical rod inside the tailgate. As the gate is lowered, the rod is moved by a hidden attachment on the edge of the body. Thus, the light is always visible!

These photos are of a 1953 Canopy Express owned by John Dunkirk of Southaven, New York.

1947-55 Suburban/Canopy Express Tail Light 1947-55 Suburban/Canopy Express Tail Light

A Pair That Stops Traffic!

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

1956 GMC 1/2 ton

My 1955 GMC 100 was locally purchased in 1995 immediately after buying the ’62 Airstream which resided for decades in a Minnesota field. As these trucks were designed, developed, and built to be work trucks, this one would continue to be so. A few months were spent designing the Jimmy so that it could be a strong, safe, and reliable hauler to pull the Airstream, a kind of Wanderlust Hotel, anywhere in North America at anytime, weather permitting.

The Jimmy’s frame was excellent, the body mostly good, but all the external and much of the internal trim had been stripped and was gone. My other vehicles at the time were working GMC pickups as were their predecessors, but the ’55 would be a special work truck capable of safely running with the big dogs while towing. All sheet metal but the cab came off, and all electrics were replaced as was every moving and non-moving part (except the nylon odometer worm gear which just broke…who knew?).

The Blue Chip GMC pickups were low volume production and very, very few reproduction parts are available. Most of the difficult to find original replacement parts were scored from Old Chevy Trucks with Jim Carter personally pulling trim items from one of his Missouri yards (it is a rare circumstance to work directly with a company’s owner for help, not once but many times). One of the key and very tricky safety items is the telescoping side view mirrors which came from a Chevy/GMC tractor of the same generation (1955-59). These were cut down and chromed so that vehicles behind the Airstream could easily be seen while using the original door mounting holes.

The rebuild took two years before undergoing a flawless 1300 mile test drive to MN to retrieve the Airstream, another two year project. Since 1999, the GMC has averaged 13,000 miles/year, a testament to a great working truck.

Hunt Jones, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey

An Inner-Line Oil Filter

Monday, October 10th, 2011

An Inner-Line oil filter from Long Island, New York!  Rarely seen today but a popular early aftermarket option.  It secures to the engine block after removing the oil distribution cover.  No oil lines.  No moving the horn forward to make room for the intake manifold mounted oil canister.

Inner-Line Oil Filter Inner-Line Oil Filter
Inner-Line Oil Filter

Aftermarket Dual Rear Wheels

Monday, April 18th, 2011

What a unique invention. When you have a 1947 through 1959 single rear wheel 3/4 or 1 ton GM truck and need more pulling power, this is the answer. American ingenuity at its best!

This new steel center hub extension includes eight long bolts to reach the original wheel studs. This holds the factory wheel in place and then provides a threaded end for the original eight lug nuts which are holding another matching wheel.

The buyer of this aftermarket kit just had to be sure his new outer tire was the same height as the original inner tire.

Pictures and data from Scott Golding, Stratton, NE.
email: scottandbetty@hotmail.com

1947-54 Radio Antenna Installation Warning

Friday, April 15th, 2011

It is very important where to drill the hole for the new radio antenna. The results of making a slight mistake will stay in your mind for many years to come!

Radios during these 1947-54 Advance Design years were never installed at the factory. This was done by the authorized GM Dealer. In the box that contained the new radio was a paper template that prevented mistakes when drilling the antenna hole. This hole in the cowl was so close to the belt line that the body to the antenna seal gasket even lacked an edge where it touched this body belt. Even with GM moving the antenna so close to the belt line there is still only about 1/2″ clearance to the hood when it is open. See photo.

The sad realization occurs later when a new radio antenna is installed by an amateur. He drills the hole in the cowl (correctly on the driver’s side) about another 3/4′ forward. He smiles as the radio works great. He doesn’t smile a week later when he tries to raise the hood to check the oil. It won’t raise! The rear hood edge hits the antenna. A rubber plug later put in the new hole is always a reminder of what a 1/2′ can do.

Hood Closed Hood Open Hood Open

A New Truck – 55 Years Old!

Friday, October 1st, 2010

Year/Make 1955 Chevrolet NAPCO Suburban

Owner: George VanOrden

1955 Chevrolet Suburban

1955 Chevrolet NAPCO Suburban

During the recent Mid-West All Truck National’s in Riverside, Missouri, a very special truck was on display. It had been brought to the show in an enclosed trailer from Virginia.The owner is George VanOrden of Fulks Run, Virginia and the vehicle is a 1955 Chevrolet Suburban with a NAPCO 4×4 system. His personal history, leading to this restored Suburban, is a story by itself. He spent his youth in this mountain section of Virginia only 10 miles from his current home. The interest in 4×4 trucks was early in life as these type trucks were regularly seen on the rough mountain roads in his county. It is not surprising George decided to restore a 4×4 after his retirement after 20 years in the U.S. Marines.

The first candidate he bought to restore was a late 50’s GM 4×4 pickup. His high hopes slowly dropped as his wife explained “Where will you put the whole family in a truck cab as the children grow?”

A new hunt began for a 4×4 Suburban which would just “fill the bill” for a medium size family hauler. This want proved a very difficult task. Few 4×4 Suburbans were sold in the 1950’s and most were later junked or used beyond restoration by off road owners.

A year of patience and a continued search finally met success. George’s wife found an ad from a Colorado owner that described a very used but not abused 1955 Suburban 4×4. It was first owned by the Colorado Forest Service and George was to become its third private owner. Rust was limited and all mechanicals could be rebuilt or replaced.

Once back in Virginia, the surface restoration began but soon went further than new paint and a clean-up. Each part to be restored opened even deeper needs. Suddenly, George was down to the frame rails. After all, with whole family to ride in the Suburban, he needed no future problems.

A nearby professional restoration shop was hired to lift the body from the frame and restore the sheet metal. George took the chassis home. That would be his project, however the 4×4 system proved to be a real challenge. As he slowly found new NAPCO parts to make the system perfect, the remainder of the chassis needed equal treatment. Then it became a must to make it all new! He just could not go this far and not make it all perfect.

The restoration shop was contacted, “Don’t just fix the dents and paint the body. I want it new!”. Compromises were not acceptable. George’s passion became research on what the 1955 was like the day it left the Chevrolet factory. Hours of collecting literature, talking to collectors, and using his computer brought out the answers and this was followed “to the letter”. There was no turning back. The Suburban was in hundreds of pieces. Even the grain, color, and seams of the new seat material came from the samples that was on the original seat upholstery.

A set of 5 bias ply 17.5 tires was the real challenge (does any factory still make them?). George located a truck for sale that had been in storage many, many years. It had new tires with even the dimples on the tread. He bought the truck just to get the tires.

George rebuilt the Suburban’s original 235 cubic inch six cylinder engine. All parts had to be new GM. Another hunt. The differential and 4 speed transmission received the same treatment.

The above is the “tip of the iceberg” of what George did to create a new 1955 Chevrolet Suburban. The restoration time was three years, completed September 2008. It is now how it came from the factory: 235 engine, 4 speed, fresh air heater, no radio, dealer added turn signals and the NAPCO installed 4×4. Ocean green paint was found under the mirror arms so George knew the correct color.

A new enclosed car trailer was a necessity. (Even more money in the project!) As a member of the Antique Auto Club of America -AACA, George thought he would see how the Suburban would do in serious judging competition. It started in the world famous Hershey PA. Fall Show. Surprise, it received a “Junior” award, the highest for a first timer. The next spring, it won the “Senior” award at the Charlotte, NC AACA show. The same year it was given a second at the AACA “Grand Nationals” in Newburn, NC.

George’s finished product has certainly attracted the attention of even the most qualified judges. He and his Suburban can’t receive honors much higher than this!

And what happened to the thought of having a clean Suburban for the family? Well, that will be the next project.

Note: Only if you are a real “die hard” NAPCO fan should you read this part of our month’s feature truck.

The 4×4 system was made by the Northwestern Auto Parts Co. of Minneapolis, MN. -NAPCO-. Of the many 4×4 add-on companies at that time, this was by far the most popular. Most medium size hill and mountain country cities had a NAPCO dealer. (GM’s factory assembled 4×4 trucks were not available until 1957).

George’s NAPCO was the last year for the Rockwell transfer case (pumpkin on the left of center). By 1956 NAPCO transfer case was made by Spicer (pumpkin on the right of center).

The Chevrolet GMC 1/2 tons were never given a 4×4 prior to 1955. Their closed drive shaft prevented a position for a transfer case. Thus, NAPCO in the early models began with a 3/4 ton which had enough of the drive shaft open to make room for this case.

When GM introduced the open drive shaft 1/2 ton in 1955, NAPCO jumped at the opportunity to offer a 4×4 for the light trucks. A redesigned 1/2 ton NAPCO system was not ready until 1956 and would include the Spicer transfer case. Therefore, the 1955 1/2 ton like George’s Suburban, plus 1/2 ton pickups were provided with the currently used 3/4 ton front end with 8 bolt wheels but internally used the 1/2 ton ring and pinion. This gave the higher speed 1/2 ton, 3.90 ratio. On the rear, 6 bolt axle spacers adapters allowed 8 bolt wheels to match the front. Very unusual but it got NAPCO quickly into the 1/2 ton 4×4 market. The 1955 1/2 ton NAPCO’s are one year only design. They really stand all with their 17.5 tires that were actually used on most 3/4 tons.

1955 Chevrolet Suburban 1955 Chevrolet Suburban 1955 Chevrolet Suburban
Interior Engine
1955 Suburban Taillights

1955-1959 GMC Hood Emblems

Thursday, February 11th, 2010


On the task force body style, 1955-1959, the GMC hoods began quite different than Chevrolet. Beginning in 1955 a large opening, 5.25″ x 25″, was used to hold a set of die cast GMC letters attached to a decorative grill.

In 1957 this grill was removed in place of a perimeter ring. Why the less attractive ring was added is a question. Possibly this grill held leaves and restricted some air intake or maybe it was a change just to be change. There was no hood opening in these last two years of this series.

By 1958-1959 GMC and Chevrolet shared the same design hood with only trim differences.

1955 1959 gmc hood

1955-1956 (above)

1955 1959 gmc hood

1957 Starndad (above)

1957 Chrome Hood Emblem

1957 Deluxe (above)

1955 1959 gmc hood

1958-1959 (above)

1955 1966 Truck Tech

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1955 Second Series-66 Chevy Truck Model I.D.

We hope the following information on Axle, Transmission and Model identification will help many of you with your questions. Accuracy was a concern as we compiled this information. Because GM made so many scheduled as well as unscheduled changes, there is much discussion about these changes.

The following is used by permission from Pickups and Panels Magazine and artist Bryant J. Stewart

1955 2nd Series

1955 truck tech 1

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
H 3100 116 ½ ton shortbed pickup, panel, Suburban
H 3124 116 ½ ton Cameo pickup
M 3200 123-1/4 ½ ton longbed pickup
F 3400 104 ¾ ton longbed pickup (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis)
G 3500 125 ¾ ton pickup (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis)
J 3600 123-1/4 ¾ ton longbed pickup
K 3700 137 ¾ ton pickup (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis)
L 3800 135 1 ton longbed pickup, panel, flatbed, stake
N 4100 130 1-½ ton flatbed, stake rack
P 4400 154 1-½ ton flatbed, stake rack
R 4500 154 1-½ ton school bus chassis
S 5100 112-5/8 2 ton low cab forward
T 5400 136-5/8 2 ton low cab forward
U 5700 160-5/8 2 ton low cab forward
V 6100 130 2 ton flatbed, stake rack
W 6400 154 2 ton flatbed, stake rack
X 6500 172 2 ton truck
Y 6700 194 2 ton school bus chassis
Z 6800 220 2 ton school bus chassis

1956

1955 truck tech 2

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
3A 3100 114 ½ ton shortbed pickup, panel, Suburban
3A 3124 114 ½ ton Cameo pickup
3B 3200 123-1/4 ½ ton longbed pickup
3C 3400 104 ¾ ton longbed pickup (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis)
3D 3500 125 ¾ ton longbed pickup (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis)
3E 3600 123-1/4 ¾ ton longbed pickup
3F 3700 137 ¾ ton pickup (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis)
3G 3800 135 1 ton pickup, panel, flatbed, stake
4A 4100 130 1-½ ton flatbed, stake rack
4B 4400 154 1-½ ton flatbed, stake rack
4C 4500 154 1-½ ton school bus chassis
6A 6100 130 2 ton flatbed, stake rack
6B 6400 154 2 ton flatbed, stake rack
6C 6500 172 2 ton
6D 6700 194 2 ton school bus chassis
6E 6800 220 2 ton school bus chassis

1957

1955 truck tech 3

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
3A 3100 114 ½ ton shortbed pickup, panel, Suburban
3A 3124 114 ½ ton Cameo pickup
3B 3200 123-1/4 ½ ton longbed pickup
3C 3400 104 ¾ ton longbed pickup (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis)
3D 3500 125 ¾ ton longbed (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis
3E 3600 123-1/4 ¾ ton longbed pickup
3F 3700 137 ¾ ton pickup (double duty) (forward control delivery chassis)
3G 3800 135 1 ton pickup, flatbed, stake rack
4A 4100 132-1/2 1-½ ton truck
4B 4400 156-1/2 1-½ ton truck
4C 4500 156-1/2 1-½ ton school bus chassis
6A 6100 132-1/2 2 ton flatbed, stake rack
6J 6200 129-5/8 2 ton truck (forward control chassis)
6B 6400 156-1/2 2 ton flatbed, stake rack
6C 6500 174-1/2 2 ton truck
6K 6600 153-5/8 2 ton truck (forward control chassis)
6D 6700 196-1/2 2 ton school bus chassis
6E 6800 222-1/2 2 ton school bus chassis

1958

1955 truck tech 4

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
3A 3100 114 ½ ton shortbed pickup, panel, Suburban
3A 3124 114 ½ ton cameo pickup
3B 3200 123-1/4 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup
3E 3600 123-1/4 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, stake
3G 3800 135 1 ton stepside pickup, panel, stake rack

1959

1955 truck tech 5

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
11/1280 119 El Camino L-6/V-8
3A 3100 114 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban
3B 3200 123-1/4 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup
3E 3600 123-1/4 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, stake rack
3G 3800 135 1 ton stepside pickup, panel, stake rack

1960

1955 truck tech 6

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
11/1280 119 El Camino L-6/V-8
C/K14 115 ½ ton 4×2/4×4 shortbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban (Apache 10)
C15 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup (Apache 10)
C/K25 127 ¾ ton 4×2/4×4 longbed step/fleetside pickup, 8′ stake bed (Apache 20)
C36 133 1 ton longbed stepside pickup, panel, 9′ stake bed (Apache 30)

1961-1963

1955 truck tech 7

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
C10 1404-34 115 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban
C15 1504-34 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup
C25 127 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, Suburban, 8′ stake bed
K14* 1404-34 115 ½ ton 4×2/4×4 shortbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban
K25* 2504-39 127 ¾ ton 4×4 longbed step/fleetside pickup
C36 1404-34 133 1 ton longbed stepside pickup, panel, 9′ stake bed

1964-1966

1955 truck tech 8

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
A5380 115 ½ ton El Camino (6 cylinder)
A5480 115 ½ ton El Camino (8 cylinder)
A5580 115 ½ ton El Camino Custom (6 cylinder)
A5680 115 ½ ton El Camino Custom (8 cylinder)
C10 115 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban
C10 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup
C20 127 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, Suburban, 8′ stake bed
K10 115 ½ ton 4×4 shortbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban
K20 127 ¾ ton 4×4 longbed step/fleetside pickup
C30 133 1 ton longbed stepside pickup, panel, 9′ stake

Note” The vehicle serial number on 1963 Four Wheel Drive models may be used to determine if the model is a First or Second Series Design. The following chart indicates each assembly plant and the sequence of vehicle serial numbers which apply to First Series or Second series.

*1st Series up to and including # *2nd Series including and begining wit # Assembly Plants
106084 106085 A= Atlanta
106732 106733 B= Baltimore
106559 106560 F= Flint
110340 110341 J= Janesville
112645 112646 N= Norwood
125965 125966 O= Oakland
118544 118545 S= St. Louis
109948 109949 T= Tarrytown

Disclaimer: This truck I. D. information is correct and complete to the best of our knowledge and is only to be used as a guide. Pickups ‘n panels and/or the National Chevy/GMC Truck Association, and Jim Carter Truck Parts, make no guarantee of accuracy, and disclaim any liability incurred in the use of this information.

Advanced Design Lighter

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

To keep the 1947-1955 GM trucks base price low, their 6 volt cigarette lighter was a dealer accessory. The vehicle always came from the factory with a round blank out plug at the lower center of the dash.

To save tooling costs both the Chevrolet and GMC truck divisions used the same lighter as was found in Chevrolet’s passenger car. It did not match other knobs in the cab. Its double ring chrome head is exclusive to General Motors though it does not carry their logo. They are often seen at swap meets and flea markets mixed with lighter accumulations from all makes. The chrome head is easily unscrewed when a replacement heating element is needed. It will attach to either a 6 or 12 volt element. The in dash receiver also must be changed. GM made a slight difference in element diameters so 6 and 12 volt units. An owner in later years could not accidentally mix the two different voltage types.

advance lighter 1

advance lighter 2

1954-1955 Example (above)

1953-1955 Fresh Air Heater

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

With the introduction of the Advance Design Cab in 1947, a new dealer installed heater also became available. When used together this new body was referred to as The Cab That Breathes.

All U.S. manufactured Advance Design Cabs had a row of louvers on the right outer cowl which allowed air to enter the cab interior with the help of the new optional fresh air heater. It was a great improvement over prior years!

As air was brought in from the outside it passed through the heater core. This warmed air usually held less humidity than air inside the cab due to the breath of passengers. The fresh, dryer, air helped prevent the inside of the windows from fogging during very cold days, thus GM said the cab breathed.

This excellent heating system was made even better in 1953 with the introduction of the revised airflow heater. By pulling a knob, at the left of the steering column, a door inside the heater would cover the outside air intake. Now the heater was of the recirculator design. It pulled air from inside the cab so that inside air was re-warmed. Yes, humidity did accumulate quicker and windows could fog but heating the air inside was faster on a cold morning.

Note these pictures of the improved 1953-55 fresh air heater. The driver operated cable was pulled and a door inside the heater shut off outside air. At the same time, a one inch wide door on the case opened to allow recirculation of air to occur. A non-related lever on the case directs the heated air to the floor or above through the defroster ducts.

This ingenious idea by GM engineers now allowed the driver to have a cab that breathed or one that did not.

1953-1955 Fresh Air Heater 1

Hand operated defroster lever, cable for intake door, and the water flow adjusting knob (above)

1953-1955 Fresh Air Heater 2

The knob at the left of the steering column for pulling the cable (above)

1953-1955 Fresh Air Heater 3

The main heater attached to the right inner cowl panel (above)

1953-1955 Fresh Air Heater 4

Side view of heater with water control rod in foreground (above)

1953-1955 Fresh Air Heater 5

A close up of the one inch intake cable operated door on the heater case (above)

1954-1955 Accessory Clock

Thursday, February 11th, 2010
1954 accessory clock
Marty Bozek, Lutz FL.eng261@aol.com
1954-1955 Chevy Accessory Clock
Pat Jackson, Johnstown, OHredchevy38@embarqmail.com

By the mid 1950’s extra income in the U.S. was creating an increased demand for accessories on both cars and trucks. To take advantage of this, the Chevrolet Truck Division introduced one item as a first. It would not appear again on Chevrolet trucks until the mid 1970’s.

The new accessory was the 1954-55 dash mounted clock. To offer the most with the least investment, only the die cast housing was new. The clock was already an accessory on the 1953-1954 Chevrolet car. By combining the two, dealers could market a clock accessory to new Chevrolet truck buyers. The housing was even painted pearl beige to match the 1954-1955 Chevrolet truck interior color.

It fit between the two dash bezels. A paper template was in the box so the dealer’s mechanic or the owner would drill the mounting holes in just the right place.

The housings are not being reproduced. They are in high demand among 1954-1955 Chevrolet truck restorers so the retail prices just keep rising. If you do locate this housing, the correct clock is not difficult to locate. They were on most 1953-1954 Chevrolet cars.

Floor Shift Foam Collar

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

This drawing is from the 1955-1959 Chevrolet Factory Assembly Manual. We have added our part number ( FL137 ) with an arrow to show the new floor shift foam collar that is now available at Jim Carter’s Truck Parts.

Click to enlarge

Floor Shift Foam Collar

1955-1959 Fan Shroud

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

By 1958 the Chevrolet V-8 fan shroud (not GMC) changed to the more traditional round design. During the V-8 beginning years in 1955-1957, it was little more than four pieces of custom sheet metal that helped pull air through the radiator core.

The enclosed pictures are of an original fan shroud for a 1958-59 Chevrolet 283 V-8. It fits only these two years of light trucks. Dimensions of the barrel is 19 inches in diameter and 20 inches deep.

The other shroud is from a 1958-1959 1 1/2 and 2 ton with V-8. There is a big difference. Be sure you purchase the correct design for the truck you have.

1958 1959 Chevrolet fan shroud 1

1958 1959 Chevrolet fan shroud 2

1958 1959 Chevrolet fan shroud 3

1958-1959 Pick Up (above)

1958 1959 Chevrolet fan shroud 4

1958-1959 1 1/2 – 2 Ton (above)

1955-1959 Starters

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Two totally different 12 volt starters were used on the 235 six cylinder Chevrolet light trucks during 1955-1959. They attach to different bellhousings and are not interchangeable.

1955 1959 starters 1

As shown in the photos, the Hydramatic transmission starter has three bolt holes for securing it to the bellhousing. A solenoid on top reacts to the drivers key switch in the dash.

The starter for the 3 and 4 speed transmission has a top mounted foot start switch. It attaches to its bellhousing with two bolts

1955 1959 starters 2

1955 1959 starters 3

1955 1959 starters 4

1955-1959 Power Steering

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Chevrolet’s linkage-type power steering is available as an RPO (Regular Production Option) on all models except Forward Control Chassis. New ease and fingertip steering control are provided because up to 80 percent of the steering work is done by hydraulic power. Maneuvering a heavily loaded truck in a small space becomes much easier, and straightaway highway travel is less fatiguing. In addition, power steering effectively damps road shock and vibration at the steering wheel.

A hydraulic pump, driven by an extension of the generator shaft, provides hydraulic pressure of 750-900 pounds per square inch. (A 30-ampere or heavy-duty 40-ampere generator is included with the power steering option.) The control valve on the Pitman arm reacts to movement of the steering wheel and regulates the flow of fluid to the power cylinder.

This valve directs fluid under pressure to either the left or right side of the piston in the power cylinder, thus providing assistance for both left and right turns. Manual steering, in case the system is inoperative, is always available.

1955 1959 power steering

1955-1957 Radiator Shroud

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

With the introduction of the new small block V-8’s in 1955 Chevrolet trucks, modified sheet metal was created to help in cooling. The new truck design came standard with the proven 235 inline six cylinder but when an optional V-8 was added, cooling modifications were necessary.

The short length V-8’s cooling fan was too far from the radiator and could pull air from above and below the engine and less through the core. To prevent this, all V-8 trucks came with an upper and lower metal baffle plate to help better pull air through the radiator.

These metal plates have become very difficult to locate in recent years. The lack of these two plates on (restored?) V-8 trucks are usually a strong indication the vehicle has been converted from an original six cylinder. The mechanic was either not aware these plates existed or had no idea of where to locate them.

During 1958-1959 the shroud was redesigned. It became a more traditional metal circle as is found on more modern vehicles. This allowed even more air to be pulled through the radiator core.

The following photos show original Chevrolet radiator cooling sheet metal from 1955-1957 V-8 trucks. The dark lines on the drawing relates to how these plates fit in the original vehicle.

1955-1957 Chevrolet Radiator Shroud

1947-1955 Air Filter

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the Advance Design Truck years, two air filters were available when an order was sent to the factory. The base air filter (no extra cost) was the oil-wetted design from earlier years. The owner was expected to place a thin layer of motor oil on the filter media. Dirt particles would be caught by the oil as it passed through the mesh material. This metal mesh looks much like the material in a kitchen pot and pan copper scraper. The owner was reminded to clean the mesh every 2000 miles for it to be effective.

For an extra $5.00 an improved oil bath air filter came with the new truck. Most everyone who used their GM truck for work duties chose this filter. It required less maintenance and was more forgiving if neglected. GM recommended cleaning in kerosene each 100 hours or 5,000 miles minimum. Part of the filter media actually sets in an oil reservoir that has a pint capacity. The oil is slowly drawn up into the filter material and collects dust particles as the air travels to the carb. * NOTE: For best results use non-detergent oil. Dirt is not held in suspension with non-detergent oil and it settles on the bottom of the reservoir. At the same time held particles slowly sink toward the oil reservoir and accumulate at the bottom. Thus, this filter is always effective due to the oil upward movement. When the oil is changed in the filter pan or reservoir the dirt is also removed.

As with other manufacture’s air filters, they will cause fuel mixture problems when not maintained. A very dirty air filter will restrict air flow into the carburetor and result in increased fuel consumption.

1947 air filter 1

1947 air filter 2

Oil Wetted (above)

1947 air filter 3

Oil Bath (above)

1947 oil filter 4

Oil Bath (above)

Chevrolet Cameo GMC Suburban Wheel Trim

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

With the introduction of the new Cameo in 1955, GM added their most deluxe features as standard equipment. This “Boulevard Pickup” was to stand out above all others.

The wheel covers were not like that on the more standard pickup. To save tooling costs on this limited production model, GM used the wheel cover on the 1955 Chevrolet Belair car. Both vehicles had 15″ wheels so the top of the line car wheel cover was chosen for the new Cameo.

cameo wheel 1

1955 Wheel Cover (above)


The same procedure occurred in 1956. The Cameo carried the 1956 Chevrolet Belair full wheel cover, not the same design as 1955.

cameo wheel 1

1956 Wheel Cover (above)


The big change in Cameo wheel trim occurred with the 1957 model. This was the first year for the 14″ wheels on the passenger car. The Belair cover was no longer a fit for the Cameo 15″ wheels. GM’s answer was to chrome the standard white 1/2 ton hub cap. To add more to the appearance, a Cameo trim ring was created to cover the outer edge of the wheel.

cameo wheel 1

1957 1958 Hub Cap and Trim Ring (above)


With the limited Cameo production in 1958, the same wheel trim was used this final year.

The 1955 year was the first for factory installed whitewall tires. It made an excellent combination with the wheel trim. This is another major change in the GM deluxe 1/2 tons looking less than work trucks. The 15″ wheels remained the same during the four years of the Suburban Carrier. GM just chromed the small standard hub cap.  No wheel ring was used as standard equipment, however the wheel was given a contrasting light color.

cameo wheel 1

Updating 1955-1959 Seats

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

For those not requiring the original seat cushions on their 1955-59 Task Force truck, a roomy comfortable substitute is available. This unit is from a 1988 body style Chevrolet or GMC truck and is almost a bolt-in.

The legs or side brackets on this newer seat comes attached to the cushions from a used truck and sets nicely by the floor edge of the 1955-1959 cab. It almost looks factory installed! Yes, the cushion edge will slightly touch the doors but cause no closing problems.

The result is a much softer seat and a definite increase in distance between your “middle” and the stock steering wheel. Almost no interference with the in cab fuel tank.

Step Side Tail Lights

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

step side tail lights

The differences between these two series of tail lights is an excellent example of lowering costs during production. To keep competitive, manufacturers will always consider making products of equivalent quality, but at lower prices.

In 1960-1966, GM, as well as several aftermarket companies, used a redesigned tail light lens and eliminated the need for the earlier metal bezel. The new plastic lens wrapped around the front edge of the same metal housing making it one piece. This new lens was created so it could also replace the previous 1955-1959 lens and bezel combination. Therefore, as supplies of 1955-1959 lenses were used up, dealership parts departments would offer the later style lens as a stepside replacement. This made the original 1955-1959 taillight the 1960-1966 type.

The black housing and wiring are the same from 1955 through 1966.

1947-1955 Tail Lights

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The Chevrolet and GMC left commercial taillight used during 1947-1953 is an excellent example of GM’s conservative thinking towards trucks. The number one purpose for trucks was work! Therefore, if a part had been very successful on a prior body design, it just might be adapted later as a part in some new styling. Savings were in production costs and tooling. The results were still a good practical part for a working vehicle.

This type of thinking it shown in the Advance Design 1947-1953 pickup taillights. The same light assembly had not only been in use on trucks since 1940 but the red lens and chrome bezel was first used in all taillights on the 1937-38 Chevrolet passenger cars.

With the introduction of the new 1947 body style, this same six volt light continued to be used. It was now turned 180 degrees, so that the clear license light lens was at the bottom, and did not shine upward as in prior years. This allowed for a smaller taillight bracket with low mounted license plate. On earlier models the high positioned license caught the wind. This plus the use of trucks on rough terrain often caused bracket failure. With the left light illuminating the license plate, the optional right taillight did not have or need this lens opening.

Because the same lens was used on the 180 degree reversed taillight in 1947-1953, the red lens letters were now upside down. This was not a problem to GM as trucks were for utility purposes. Changing the lens tooling just to make the cast letters show upright was not a consideration. The red lens sold by authorized Chevrolet or GMC dealers normally had STOPRAY block letters at the top and either GUIDE letters in script or “STIMSONITE” in block letters at the bottom. In 1949 GM changed the red lens from glass to plastic. This thinner material reduced overall weight and gave a brighter red when light passed through. The various aftermarket lens manufacturers also followed GM’s procedure. Even their lens lettering is reversed when placed on the 1947-53 trucks. It appears they also designed this lens with the 1937-1938 car in mind.

The light on the pickup and larger truck has a rectangle shape with dimensions 4 inch high x 2 1/2 inch wide. An authentic 1940-1953 GM light bucket will have the block letters GUIDE-MADE IN USA stamped on the back. These letters are not visible when attached to the factory taillight bracket. In 1947-1953 the 1/4 inch block letters STOPRAY were stamped in the top of the light bucket. These letters, prior to 1947, had been stamped in the area at the rear of the license lens on the opposite end when the bucket was reversed. In this way “STOPRAY” is always seen on the top in this series of taillight. The running light bulb (illuminating both the license and red lens) is three candle power. The stop light bulb, positioned behind the center of the lens, is 21 candle power. The bezel was chrome over the black bucket until copper shortages occurred in 1952-1953 due to the Korean War. The bezel then became black.

One minor change in this design over its early years was the reversing of a very small water drain hole in the lens retaining bezel. Engineers knew this water escape hole would be needed for drying and to drain moisture from within the bucket as the cork bezel gasket began to deteriorate within several years. This drain hole was centered in the bottom of the original light bezel; however, between 1947-1953 when the light was reversed, the bottom drain went to the lower right. This was due to an internal securing bracket welded the middle of the bezel and preventing there being a place for a center drain hole.

This taillight as used on pickup and larger trucks is mostly unprotected from the elements when located beside or under the bed. Tests quickly showed that some type of seal would be necessary in the hole where the two light wires from the bulb exited the taillight. As a modern rubber seal had not been perfected, GM skillfully came up with a solution. An approximately 2 ft. long, 5/16 inch diameter cloth woven black lacquered tube was inserted one inch into the bucket taillight wire hole. The inside end was flattened on the two wires with a heavy metal staple. This prevented the loom from being removed, protected the wires, and prevented water from entering the housing.

With the total redesign of the step bed in 1954, the six volt taillights were also changed. They became round four inch diameter units with one light bulb having two filaments of three and twenty one candle power. The lens retaining bezel was chrome plated on the more deluxe truck, painted black like the bucket on the standard models. The clear license lens was in the bottom of this bucket to illuminate the plate below. With the optional rear bumper on pickups, the license plate moved to the middle of the truck and the taillight did not have the lower lens window. As before, the right light was an option.

The 1947-55 taillights on the panel truck, suburban, and canopy express (single unit bodies) had no similarity to those on the pickup and big trucks. On panel trucks a single light was placed near the center of the left “barn door”. The lens retaining bezel was chrome with dimensions of 3 inch high by 4 1/2 inches wide. A decorative stainless two inch wide strip on top of the housing has the stamped letters GUIDE R17 T. A single socket in the housing holds a double filament bulb of 3 and 21 candle power. The license plate bracket is secured to the rear of the bucket and allows illumination of the tag below the light. During these Advance Design years, this panel truck lens and chrome bezel were also used on the rear fender of the Harley Davidson motorcycle.

The canopy express and suburban bodies also displayed a single taillight with suspended lower license. It was attached to a cast metal swing bracket on the center of the tailgate. This bracket plus a special vertical connecting rod made up an ingenious design. When the tailgate was opened to its horizontal position, the taillight and license would swing 90 degrees so that it could still be seen by the following traffic.  This round taillight was normally black with a 4 3/4 inch diameter chrome lens retaining bezel. Inside are two sockets holding individual bulbs of 3 and 21 candle power. Block letters on top state GUIDCOLITE STANDARD. To save costs GM adapted this light from a prior application. It had been the GMC pickup taillight from the late 30’s through 1946. During these Advance Design truck years the light was also found on General Motors station wagons through 1952.

As the 1950’s progressed, there were increasing requests for a right tail light.  This was a GM dealer installed option to be placed on new or pre-owned vehicles. On pickups it was easy! The option included a right side light and bracket closely matching the standard left assembly.

Adding a turn single option today 1947-1955 single unit body created problems for GM designers. Neither the single factory taillight on the double door or the center unit on the tail gate were in a good position to be matched with a second live assembly. GM solved this by offering a turn signal kit containing two matched taillights. These were dealer installed beside the vehicle belt line near the doors and above the edge of the tailgate. These small bullet shaped lights were actually from a 1939 Chevrolet passenger car. It appears GM dusted off the ten year old car taillight tooling and kept expenses on this option to a minimum. The letters “DURAY” are stamped in the top of the painted housing. The chrome bezel retains a 2 5/8 inch diameter red glass lens. Due to a small water drain hole, there is a right and left on these turn signal lights.

NOTE: It is interesting that both the pickup truck and the tailgate lights, each developed during the late 1930’s, continued with separate bulbs and sockets for each filament. The door mounted oval panel truck light, introduced in mid 1947, was provided with a more modern double filament bulb in one socket.

1955-1957 GMC Fender Emblem

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1955 1957 gmc fender emblem

During the mid-1950’s most car and truck manufacturers begin to install optional V-8 engines in their vehicles. To set the vehicles apart from their six cylinders, V-8 emblems were designed.

This GMC front fender V-8 emblem was used during 1955 through 1957. The GMC letters were on both six and V-8 trucks.

The pictured Hydramatic emblem is removable and would not be in place on a truck with a 3 or 4 speed manual transmission.

1955-1959 GMC Emblems

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the mid 1950’s, V-8 engines began to gain popularity. Many became an option in full size cars and trucks that normally were provided with a six cylinder. When this occurred, most vehicles were given a body emblem advertising that the larger power plant was under the hood.

1955 1959 gmc V8 emblems

1955-1957 (above left) | 1958-1959 (above right)

GMC trucks were no exception. During the 1955-59 body style, two different shapes of V-8 emblems were used. Both die cast designs were attached to the front fender below the GMC letters. The above picture shows these V-8 emblems and the different GMC letters that appeared above them. If the truck came with a six cylinder, only the letter emblem was used on the fender. Today, as many older trucks are given modern V-8 engines, the original V-8 emblems have become almost impossible to find. The demand for these rare emblems has far exceeded their availability.

1955-1959 GMC Bumper Guards

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

GMC bumper guards during these years were standard equipment and stamped from the same heavy gauge metal as the bumper (a different style and lighter gauge metal were dealer accessories on Chevrolet light trucks).

A slight change in design was made at the end of the 1956 year. A more decorative pointed end was given the guards during 1957 through 1959.

1955 1959 gmc bumper guards 1

1955-1959 GMC (above)

1955 1959 gmc bumper guards 2

1955-1956 GMC (above)

1955 1959 gmc bumper guards 3

1957 GMC (above)

1955 1959 gmc bumper guards 4

1957-1959 GMC (above)

1955 1959 gmc bumper guards 5

1955-1959 Chevrolet (above)

Hood Ornament, 1947 – Early 1955

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the 1947-1955 years, no less than four different front hood emblems were used during regular production on the Chevrolet 3000 series trucks. Though all can be made to interchange during this 7 1/2 year series; for the perfectionist, there are only certain types for certain years.

hood ornaments 1a

In 1947, the 1/2, 3/4, and 1 ton Chevrolet trucks began production by displaying a chrome plated die cast emblem with dimensions of 3-3/8″ x 19″. The Chevrolet letters across the center are red and a small royal blue “BOWTIE” is above. On the back side their four attaching points (part of the casting) are threaded and extend outward to better provide metal to hold the securing screws. Because of the length of these four extensions, the hood must be provided with appropriate dimples. These dimples are necessary so the emblem can be pulled snug against the hood front.

Sometime in late 1948 and early 1949, depending on the assembly plant, this emblem changed to chrome plated stamped steel. Visually, it has the same dimensions and painting as the earlier style but is much less in weight.

In late 1952, the front of this emblem was again changed. It was now stainless steel. The four hood attaching clips (welded to the front stainless) and the threaded studs remained plain steel as in the prior style. The dimensions were as in past years. This design was carried through all of 1953. Forty five years later this stainless steel emblem is often seen at flea markets with the front skin in excellent condition but the four welded-in clips either gone or rusted beyond repair. These clips, hidden between the stainless emblem skin and the hood front, did not dry quickly between rains and the morning dew.

Because the hoods are larger on the 4000 and 6000 series 1-1/2 and 2 top Chevrolet trucks, the front emblem was formed to conform to their bigger size. Width and length dimensions are the same as the smaller 3000 series trucks and will interchange. However, to help compensate for the larger hood size, these big truck emblems are almost 1/4″ thicker at their widest point in comparison to the smaller 3000 series. Their construction materials changed during this series as did the smaller 3000 series trucks.

The 5000 series Chevrolet COE bodies (CAB OVER ENGINE) did not change their initial die cast hood emblem. It continued identical from it’s 1947 introduction through 1953. The dimensions 3-1/2″ x 26-1/2″ were much longer than the conventional cabs due to the COE’s massive one piece hood.

The 1954-1955 hood emblem was a different design and better related with the totally new grille. As Chevrolet was now stamped on the top grille bar, these letters were no longer on the emblem. The “BOWTIE” trademark became larger and the overall emblem continued with a stainless skin and plain steel inside attachments overall dimensions on the 3000 series trucks is 3-7/8″ x 21″. With this new design, the clips did not extend back as in prior years. Therefore, the dimples were not stamped in the hood. This is a quick way to tell the 1954-1955 from the earlier 1947-1953 hoods.

On the 4000 and 6000 series the 1954-55 Chevrolet emblem has an overall increase in size of approximately 20% or 4-1/8″ x 24″. This was necessary to better conform with the larger truck hood. The emblem remained a stainless steel stamping with the same appearance as the smaller trucks.

General Motors designed the 5000 series or COE emblems on the 1954-55 the same in size and style as those on the conventional cab large truck hoods with two exceptions. This COE emblem is chrome plated die cast and lacks the notches for the bullnose strip. The unique one piece size of the COE hood eliminated the need for a center divider strip and thus no center notches were in the emblem.

Early 1955 COE

All the truck “BOWTIE” emblems in 1954-1955 were Chevrolet royal blue however the valleys between the twenty four vertical ridges were painted red in 1954 and white on the early 1955 series. The GMC trucks between 1947-55 did not have a front hood emblem. Die cast GMC letters were attached to an upper grille housing.

Hood ornaments were an important part of automotive styling in the 1940’s through 50’s. However, as trucks were basically for work GM created specific ornaments for these vehicles but made them a dealer accessory. They are rare and in demand today as hobbyists now look for General Motors accessories to add to their restored trucks.

To help the dealer install the 1947-1953 Chevrolet accessory ornament correctly, the factory placed a small hole between the hood halves 33″ from their rear edge. This is for positioning the rear threaded stud of the ornament. The dealer would then drill two pair of holes on either side of the hood divider strip and the result was a perfect fit.

On the 1954-1955 Chevrolets, the accessory ornament was totally changed in design. A chrome eagle with low wings was attached to a die cast base. To save expenses GM used the same eagle that was also an accessory on 1953-54 Chevrolet passenger cars. The mounting base was not the same partially due to the difference in the width of car and truck hood bullnose strips. Between 1947-55, the dealer installed GMC accessory hood ornament did not change. It had a very narrow die cast mounting base attaching directly to the bullnose strip. This supports an attractive streamlined jet plane. It does not resemble the Chevrolet ornament.

Battery Shields

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

On the Advanced Design Pickups, the battery was under the passenger side of the cab floor. To protect
the battery from road debris (gravel, sand and ice) it was important that it be protected from this coming

from the right front tire.

Designers of the Chevrolet and GMC installed a metal plate riveted in place. A simple extra to what

might have been a problem to customers.

(On the 1946 and older trucks the batteries were only protected by their partial tray.)

 

1950 GMC 1 Ton

 

1954-1955 GMC Bed Reflector

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

By 1954, the Korean War shortages were history. More trim and chrome plating began to show up in trucks and cars. The Chevrolet and GMC truck divisions both introduced a deluxe model for their pickups during mid-year 1954. Hopes were to appeal to the emerging buyers with more disposable income.

The deluxe model of these two trucks shared most of the same sheet metal, however special unique items kept each individual! One of these exclusive items was used only on the top of the line GMC pickup. This was the bed-roll reflector. It was never placed on Chevrolets or the basic GMC pickup.

In today’s world this extra is almost impossible to locate. Not only was it on the deluxe GMC’s but few of these top of the line models found buyers. Most still thought of trucks as workers and ordered the basic vehicle. This reflector is on the very end of the bed roll and it is exposed to being damaged while backing.

To save tooling costs, GMC designers borrowed the red reflector lens from the 1953 Buick taillight. Unfortunately, the stainless ring (riveted to the bed roll) is exclusive only to the rare deluxe GMC pickup.

1954 gmc bed reflector 1

1954 gmc bed reflector 2

1954 gmc bed reflector 3

1954 gmc bed reflector 4

Difference – 1947-55 GMC Grilles

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the Advance Design years, 1947-55, Chevrolet and GMC each changed their grille designs twice. GMC made the change at the end of the second year and Chevrolet made the change at the end of the seventh year.

Possibly to save tooling cost GMC, not Chevrolet, always used the same grille on all truck sizes in any one year. As Chevy used a similar but slightly larger grill on their 1 1/2 and 2 ton. GMC did not change the size on trucks between 1/2 and 2 tons.

In 1947-48 GMC used a three bar heavy gauge chrome steel grille. Actually, it was for the heavy weight for the 2 tons but fit in the 1/2 ton by using a smaller grill surround.

The big grille change for GMC was in 1949 when it was made as a four bar design. To the non truck enthusiast, it looked somewhat like the earlier years which is probably what GMC designers planned.

Current GMC grille reproductions are often sold as 1947=55. Actually they are the four bar type for 1949-55. The 1947-48 GMC owners get a surprise due to the modifications needed to fit the later reproduction grille into their early housing!

Click on images below to enlarge

1947-1948 Three Bar Grille 1947-1948 Three Bar Grille C.O.E Four Bar Grille
Three to Five Ton Four Bar Grille
Half Ton to One Ton Four Bar Grille
Half Ton to One Ton Four Bar Grille

1947-1948 GMC Grille and Bumper

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Used only the first 1 1/2 years into this body style, these GMC grilles stand out for their different shape and very heavy duty construction. Because of it’s weight this assembly, it sets on the frame and is given extra support by a pair of steel rods extended at an angle to the frame rail.  See photo.

The grille has three horizontal bars and uses a heavier gauge metal than the four bar grille introduced in 1949. This same unit is found during 1947 and 1948 in all 1/2 ton through 2 ton GMC trucks.

On these early 1/2, 3/4, and 1 ton trucks the splash apron from the grill to the bumper is even different. The front bumper is the most unusual. It is rounded much like an automobile and has three bumper bolts on each side.  They all have the small grill guard on the 1/2 and 3/4 ton.

Some suppliers of 1947 – Early 1955 bumpers and grilles state they are all the same.  But, they are not.  The 1947-1948 stands alone!

1947 1948 gmc grill 1

1947-1948 “3” Bar (above)

1947 1948 gmc grill

Note the 3 bumper bolts.  The center secures the front splash apron and securing braces.  The other two are used by the dealers to attach GMC accessory larger grille guards to the bumper.

1947 1948 gmc grill 2

1947-1948 “3” Bar (above)

1947 1948 gmc grill 3

1947-1948 Angle Grille Support (above)

1947 1948 gmc grill 4

1949-1955 “4” Bar (above)

1947 1948 gmc grill 4

1955-1959 Door Differences

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Though the 1955-1959 GM doors are basically the same and will interchange, there is one noticeable difference. The inside metal door panel (covering window and door mechanisms) is held in place with smaller screws in 1955.

It is assumed these smaller 10 x 24 screws were easier to break or strip when over tightening on the assembly line. By 1956, GM had increased their size to 1/4″ x 20 and this remained through the series.

1947-1955 Suburban Interiors

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Since their beginning in 1935, the Chevrolet Suburban was always the “people hauler” of General Motors commercial fleet of trucks. They were designed to carry more weight on rough roads than was the passenger car station wagon. While trucks were carrying freight from the time of their purchase, Suburban’s were reserved for passengers! It became an immediate success with the military, as a school bus on smaller rural routes, for transporting people from train and bus stations to hotels, etc.

After WWII, the Advance Design Suburban body design (introduced in 1947) began to attract more individual owners for family transportation needs. To better provide this with limited expense, General Motors added just a few extras for appearance. This was tan rubber floor mats and a two tone painted interior. Neither was like what was on the pickup or large trucks.

The Suburban interior colors are Pecan Brown and Wicker Brown. This all harmonized with the brown headliner, floor mat and seat upholstery. All makes a nice interior package with little extra expense to GM.

The following should help the restorer have an even a better idea of the 1947-53 Advance Design Suburban when new. Photos are of a 1953 untouched Suburban that was left with original paint and used as a fire department ambulance in Lamont, Illinois. Photos taken about 2005 after being bought from the city of Lamont.

Because General Motors always kept production cost as low as possible on truck related models, they designed the Suburban on the pre-existing 1/2 ton pickup chassis as well as using the same sheet metal on its doors, front end, and dash. To dress up the body for passengers, GM added these extra appearance features not found on their trucks. Though these additions were nice, they were still a long way from the appointments on the cars and station wagons being sold in the same dealerships.

The door panel frames and removable interior window trim of the 1947-53 are a shade darker, Wicker Brown as in photo E. Even the seat frames were also this darker brown, photo f. The seat upholstery is brown Spanish grain while trucks in 1947-1953 were maroon. The cardboard door panels match the seat texture and color. The tan floor mats and red brown door windlace colors are Suburban only.

The lighter Pecan Brown was placed on the body sheet metal that became part of the total assembly. This is inner quarter panels, doors, dash, tailgate or double doors, and front seat riser. All was painted at one time after being welded together as a single unit. See Photos.

One very different touch on the Suburban over the truck is the color of the seven horizontal ridges on their 1947-1951 dash. Note picture A and B. These ridges are the color of the darker interior trim. Photo C shows the truck (not Suburban) dash ridges which were silver to closely match the upper and lower dash horizontal stainless.

By 1952-1953 the dash stainless had been exchanged for painted steel due to Korean War shortages. Then both the Suburban and truck dashes were without contrasting colors but still kept overall interior coloring. See photo D.

In 1954-1955 the Suburban and truck body shared a new redesigned dash panel and the interior body colors were also changed. The two body styles now used the same pearl beige color on their interior metal. A medium brown Spanish grain vinyl was on the seats of both body styles. Contrasting color interior window frames were not on the 1954-1955 Suburban as seen on earlier Advance Design models. They were the color of the main body panels.

If you have decided to restore your rare early Advance Design Suburban as it left the factory, these tips can separate the men from the boys in serious judging. To some it may be just as important for the daily driver.

1947 1955 suburban interiors 1

Photo A (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 2

Photo B (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 3

Photo C (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 4

Photo D (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 5

Two Tone Door Panel (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 6

Photo E (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 7

Photo F (above)

Advance Design Speedometers

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

No less than five speedometers were used in Chevrolet trucks during the Advance Design years, 1947-1955. If you want your truck just right, be sure you understand the differences. Restoring one you have on a shelf or purchased at a swap meet may not be proper for your year. The following will provide a description of differences.


1947 speedometer

1947

Red-Orange needle. Lower two tabs 4 3/4″ apart. 80 MPH (A clear needle means the color has faded away.)


1947 speedometer

1948

Red-Orange needle. Lower two tabs 6″ apart. 80 MPH


1947 speedometer

1949-1951

White needle, lower two tabs 6″ apart. 80 MPH


1947 speedometer

1952-1953

White needle, lower two tabs 6″ apart. 90 MPH


1947 speedometer

1954-1955

Totally different from earlier years. Silver needle over black face. Few parts interchange


Then there is the GMC speedometers used during 1947-1955 (Only 1952-1953 are the same.) That is another story!

1947-1955 Running Boards

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the 1947-1955 Advance Design years three different stock running boards on pickups and panel trucks were produced. Features such as width, number of ribs, thickness of metal, and length of under-braces are the same. When placed together, a difference in length is obvious.

The longest unit was used on the 1 ton pickup and panel trucks with 134′ wheelbase. The pickup bedside has four stake pockets and bed wood length of 107′.

A middle length running board is seen on the ¾ ton pickup (no panel trucks were that length) with 125 wheelbase. The bed side has three stake pockets and bed wood length of 85 3/4′.

The short running board is seen on 1/2 ton pickups, Suburbans, and panel trucks with 116′ wheelbase. The pickup bed side has two stake pockets and bed wood length is 76 7/8′.

When found off a truck at swap meets or in salvage yards, the running boards can be distinguished quickly by observing the number of holes where bolts connect the filler splash aprons. The 1 tons have 5, 3/4 tons have 4, and 1/2 tons have 3.

The adjacent photos are of un-restored running boards with no alterations.

1947 1955 running boards 1

1947 1955 running boards 2

1947 1955 running boards 3

1947-1955 Optional Wide Running Boards

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

One of the most unusual and rare options for the 1947-1955 1/2 tons are ‘wide running boards’. The adjacent picture is from the 1949 Chevrolet Salesman’s Data Book. The photos below are of used original boards recently found at an Oklahoma swap meet.

They consist of ‘short’ running boards as used on all flat bed ¾ and 1 ton trucks plus a matching wide rear board extensions. The splash apron is totally redesigned to properly fill the different opening between the board and bed. See photo.

GM marketed these optional boards to allow more standing or foot room near the front of the ½ ton bed. Normally a person can not place his complete foot on a stock running board in this area. This option gave more comfort to the person spending much time on the running boards moving merchandise at the front of the bed.

1947 1955 optional wide running boards 1

1947 1955 optional wide running boards 2

1947 1955 optional wide running boards 3

1954-1955 Radio Blank Out

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

All 1954-1955 Chevrolet/GMC trucks came from the factory with a blank-out plate to cover where the radio would be installed. As this accessory was dealer installed the plate could be removed (probably thrown away) and the new radio added.

This blank-out plate and its two special clips has become very rare in recent years. They are not being reproduced. The enclosed photos show an original painted plate. The Chevrolet unit is the interior cab pearl beige color with a stamped bow-tie in black. GMC chose to not add their logo. These plates are just like Chevrolet except have a smooth surface with no trade letters.

1954 1955 radio blank out 1
Chevrolet (installed)

1954 1955 radio blank out 1

Chevrolet (above)

1954 1955 radio blank out 2

GMC (above)

1954 1955 radio blank out 3

Back View (above)

Radio Trivia

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

  • Push buttons were discontinued at the end of 1953 and did not reappear until 1967
  • Prior to 1959 radios used mechanical vibrator tubes. They would operate with either positive or negative ground. A low buzzing sound could always be heard from the tube area before the radio warmed up, once the sound began, the speaker made the buzzing difficult to hear. In recent years a major change has occurred. Vibrator tubes have been gradually replaced with a modern solid state style These are ruined if the battery is reversed. A positive ground tube cannot be placed in a negative ground vehicle
  • The 1947-1955 four staff cowl mounted antenna could be extended almost four feet. This helped pull in at least one station in rural areas
  • With a totally redesigned dash in 1954, the radio was given a major change. It remained AM only but with push buttons discontinued, it became almost half the size of the previous model
  • From 1959 and older, GM truck radios had two lead wires. One usually attached to the headlight switch so the dial light went on with the dash lights. The other wire attached to a 20 amp fuse and then to the ignition switch “hot” connection
  • The AM-FM radio was first available in GM trucks in 1970, not in 1967. These units have one sound track and are not stereo
  • In 1947, with the introduction of the Advance Design body style, GM trucks for the first time had a place in the dash to install a radio
  • In relation to wages, early radios were very expensive. A 1949 radio had a retail price of about $74.50 when it was difficult to carry $5.00 in groceries
  • The dash on the 1954-1959 GMC and 1955-59 Chevrolet has no place for a speaker opening. Thus, the factory speaker is placed between the sunvisors above the windshield

1947-1955 Deluxe Panel Truck

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

For the Perfectionist

During the first half of the Advance Design years (1947-1955), GM offered a special panel truck as an option. This deluxe model was designed for a company wanting to give a more upscale appearance to their retail customers.

During the era of one car families, the lady of the house looked more toward home deliveries for essentials. GM knew there was a demand for this type panel truck in nicer residential neighborhoods. They targeted stores and shops that provided home deliveries. With a relatively small investment GM added a stainless steel trim package that gave their pre-existing panel truck a very special look. The chrome grill and bumpers plus stainless trim around the windshield and side door windows was already being used on the deluxe pickup.

GM then created some extras for their panel. Three horizontal strips at the lower edge of each fender, a long narrow horizontal spear toward the top of the front fenders, and a stainless edging surrounding the two rear door windows added to the panels appearance. Wheels were body colored with three stripes, not black as on the standard model.

The slower selling one ton panel was also available with this deluxe option. This nicely appointed larger panel was right at home in new exclusive suburbs delivering carpet rolls, furniture, carrying pipe for the plumber, etc.

Production of these Advance Design deluxe panel trucks was ceased in mid to late 1951. Korean War shortages and the resulting high cost of stainless steel eliminated this optional package. After the war years this deluxe model with the many horizontal trim strips was introduced again as the 1954 through mid-1955. With limited production, the short lived optional deluxe panel truck is a very rare sight in today’s world. Locating most of the necessary parts to transform a standard panel to a deluxe model is now possible from Jim Carters Truck Parts.

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

1947-50 1/2 ton Deluxe Panel (above)

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks
Factory Drawing

For Panel models, this option includes bright metal reveals for side door windows, rear door windows and windshield; garnish moldings for side door windows; arm rest for driver’s side door, bright metal moldings for front and rear fenders, right-hand sun shade and chromium-plated radiator grille. (Not originally available on Canopy Express models or Carryall Suburban’s, however will fit both perfectly.)

Early GMC Paint Schemes

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Since the introduction of GMC’s first 1/2 ton pickup in 1936, there has always been a sharing of most sheet metal parts with Chevrolet trucks. This was done mostly for economic reasons. However, when possible, each of the two brands tried to make inexpensive changes to be different than the other.

Some specific examples of this occurred during the Advance Design years (1947-1955). These two marques tried to stand apart from each other on most exterior features when it was financially possible.

Several very visible changes required no extra investment. Only a change in paint colors helped to separate the two trucks.

A. The running board splash aprons are one of the best examples. From 1947 through at least 1951 GMC painted these black. Chevrolet’s were the color of the cab and bed.

B. The front splash aprons on Chevrolets were body color. The GMC’s were black.

C. When the GMC carried a standard non-chrome bumper, it was black. Chevrolet did not offer black bumpers during any of the advance design years.

D. The names and shades of the exterior body colors are different. This was not difficult as Chevrolet and GMC were assembled in different assembly plants.

Note: We now find most restored Advance Design GMC’s have their splash aprons and bumpers painted the same color as the Chevrolets. As there are many more Chevrolets than GMC’s, people must assume that their GMC should be painted like a Chevrolet. The following factory GMC photos show a different story.

These factory photos provided, with permission, from the website www.oldgmctrucks.com

gmc paint 1

A. 1947-1951 GMC (above)

gmc paint 2

B. Front Splash (above)

gmc paint 3

C. Black Bumpers (above)

gmc paint 4

D. Paint Chart (above)

Paint Color Attitudes -The Early Years

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

When observing un-restored GM trucks of the 1930-55 era, one will notice the majority of these vehicles were originally dark green. An explanation is simple. Green was their standard color! If you did not specify one of the other approximately eleven non-extra cost colors, your truck would be delivered green.

The standard color of truck had been thought of as green since the late 1920’s on many brands. Though yellow, red, and orange was part of the non-extra cost GM paint options, they were mostly offered by businesses that wished to gain attention or follow their company logos. Individuals usually did not order bright colors.

In the Advance Design years, 1947-55, conservative colors were the norm. The standard dark green was followed mostly by dark blue and black. Even maroon was seen on a limited number of GM trucks.

Buy Parts for 1934 to 1946 Trucks

Two Tone Panel

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the 1955-1959 Chevrolet Task-Force truck years, the panel body style remained very popular. To help sales continue to grow, a two tone paint scheme was offered. This option was used for the business customer that planned on having their logo applied to the panel.

A wide band on the sides and back was painted Bombay Ivory*. This two tone paint looked very attractive, as is, when leaving the factory but it also provided the correct background for most company logos. The baked on factory ivory paint would hold up better and did not require sanding and painting by a body shop. Only a sign painter was needed to add the company logo.

two tone panel 1

The above drawing is from a page in the 1959 Chevrolet salesman’s data book. The two-tone paint is Dawn Blue with Bombay Ivory inserts.

The photos are of a local 25,000 mile 1959 panel truck also in Dawn Blue. Note how the white comes to a point at the top and bottom of the side door window opening.

* The Bombay Ivory inset was not offered on panels painted white.

two tone panel 2

two tone panel 3

two tone panel 4

two tone panel 5

two tone panel 6

1955 Chevrolet Advance Design

Tuesday, January 1st, 2008

Owner: Marty Bozek

1955 chevrolet truck

This month we feature one of the most unique eye catching Advance Design 1/2 tons in the country. On daily runs it is a real traffic stopper. At car shows it is surrounded by curious admirers and trophies seem to be a regular occurrence.

This little 1955 1st series ½ ton is the creation of Marty and Jean Bozek near Tampa, Florida. It was bought from the second owner in 1983 after starting its life in 1955 near Colorado Springs, Colorado. The potential of this truck in primer with no prior restoration became a challenge. Almost all restoration and upgrades were done by Marty in the evening at his home near New York City. His goal was to keep it original in appearance yet add modern updates that would look different only to the expert. The result is a 1/2 ton that turns heads and puts out the performance of a V8!

Marty has given his truck a 261 six cylinder (big brother to the famous 235) a 4 barrel carburetor, Howard cam, Fenton cast iron headers, electronic ignition, aluminum radiator, and ‘old time’ Smitty glass pack mufflers.

The transmission is the very popular 5 speed overdrive once found in Camaros and Firebirds in the 1980’s. It’s overdrive 5th gear performs just right on the open highway but gives the low speed power Marty wants for in town performance.

Even the differential has 3.55 gearing. This was by adding a complete 1973 Chevrolet Blazer rear end assembly. The rear tires fit the wheel wells just right. No rubbing the fenders on rough roads.

Now retired in Florida, Marty keeps improving his creation. He often thinks about modifications and has added a few additional items to his little ½ ton. He does it in his own way so that it is just right for this type of truck. A few recent additions were adding the 5 speed overdrive transmission and cold air conditioning. (No it doesn’t run hot in Florida summers.) Even the doors, firewall, top, floors, and rear cab wall have been sealed with hidden insulation!

This Chevy 1/2 ton may not out run a telegram but the race is close. Marty says ‘It idles like a sewing machine and goes like hell. Why would I even consider a V8?’ It is ‘the’ eye catcher at any auto show. Trophies have been many but some stand out more than others.

In Tampa, FL a large monthly cruise night gives a best of show honor at the end of the year. All the monthly winners compete for ‘Best of the Best.’ Yes, this little yellow pickup received the top award. They don’t get better than this!

Marty painted this truck in 1994. Several years ago it received the ‘Best Paint’ award in a show with hundreds of participants in Northern Florida. How’s that for non trailered vehicle that was painted about 10 years ago?

In 1999, at the Carlisle, Pennsylvania ‘All Truck Nationals,’ this truck received a second place trophy in the older truck class.

If you wish to talk to Marty Bozek about his special truck, the email address is: eng261@aol.com. (You must identify yourself as a truck person so you don’t get mixed and discarded with the junk mail.)

1955 chevrolet truck 1955 chevrolet truck 1955 chevrolet truck

1955 chevrolet truck 1955 chevrolet truck 1955 chevrolet truck

1955 Chevrolet

Friday, September 1st, 2006

Owner: Tim Etes

1955 chevrolet pick up truck

Here are some of the before and after pictures of my 1955 First Series Chevrolet Truck, complete August, 2006.

My nine year old son and I did a lot of the work;including a significant portion of the body, mechanical and reassembly-finish work!

Purchased last March (2005) on eBay (from a person just seven miles away, ironically), he never had the opportunity to begin the restoration and reconstruction process. We counted up the number of parts we moved from his house to ours and it was in an amazing 117 pieces! He purchased the vehicle from a Colorado farmer and transported it to Wisconsin nine years ago, where he and his son disassembled it for a ground up restoration.

I went with digital gauges, but kept the original 235 Chevy 6, with the granny-low 4 for Parades and to better make the Fenton-Cherry Bomb combination sound better when I take off!

Nick-named the Killer Bee

Enjoy! We are!

1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck

1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck

1955 Chevrolet

Sunday, May 1st, 2005

Owner: John Carlton

1955 chevrolet pick up truck

I have owned this truck since 1970, using it for fun and everyday use. Jim Carter’s used parts have been a life saver for this old baby. All of the restoration has been only to maintain, repair or replace with original or original-reproduction parts.

Buy Parts for 1947 to 1955 Trucks

1955 Chevrolet Cameo

Wednesday, December 1st, 2004

Owner: James Whalen

1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck

Thanks again for the Cardinal Red paint for the wheels. Paint matched well. Thank you for your continued support and commitment to these trucks. This Cameo, before restoration, had only 32,000 documented miles. It has been quite a learning curve for me. This truck was purchased as a pull vehicle to bring my NCRS TOP FLIGHT Corvette to car shows. What a combination.

Thanks again.
Jim Whalen
Loudonville New York

1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck 1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck 1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck

1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck 1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck 1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck

1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck 1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck 1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck

1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck 1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck 1955 chevrolet cameo pick up truck

1955 Chevrolet

Monday, December 1st, 2003

Owner: Ismael Perez

1955 chevroloet pick up truck

350 Engine
400 Transmission
9″ Ford posi-track
78 Ford Mustang suspension.
This truck has 1954 windows

1955 chevroloet pick up truck

1955 Chevrolet

Tuesday, April 1st, 2003

Owner: Bud Jones – Bakersfield, CA

1955 chevrolet pick up truck

I purchased my 1955 Chevy Truck in 1993 for $3,000.00 and just finished it this month. As you can see the frame has been modified with a 1973 4×4 Chevy Blazer running gears. The transmission is a Turbo 350 and the engine is a stock 350 Chevy. It’s also equipped with a Vintage heating and air condition unit. The seat is a 40/60 bench from a 1993 full size Chevy pick up. The dash is Dakota Digital. The interior matches the gray two-tone gray seat for the 1993 Chevy pick up and after market door panels, kick panels and head liner. The original radio still works with an additional hidden remote control stereo system underneath the seat. The bed has new oak planks that look just outstanding. There’s also a tilt steering column by I-Did-It. The engine compartment is mostly dressed out with polished aluminum accessories. One last thing thanks to Jimmy Carter I was able to purchase some of the hard to get items for my truck. Thanks,

Bud Jones
9600 Split Oak Court
Bakersfield, CA 93311
Phone: 661.664.8548

1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck

1955 Chevrolet First Series

Saturday, February 1st, 2003

Owner: Mike Harness – Blacksburg, VA

1955 chevrolet first series pick up truck

My truck is a 1955 Chevrolet 3100 First Series Deluxe Cab. My wife used to ride in this truck as a girl in the late 1950’s. It belonged to her neighbor, the original owner. That neighbor drove it for years, and then sold it to another neighbor who used in on his farm for years. Then it was parked by the creek for about five years before I spotted it while on a Sunday drive in 1992.

It was quite rusty and had a set of cattle racks on it. But, I couldn’t resist. With a new battery, a little gas down the carburetor, a slightly burned cousin (who now knows not to pour too much gas because it just might backfire), we started it and I drove it home. I soon had the original 235 engine rebuilt, then embarked on the long journey with Jim Carter’s Antique Truck Parts to restore what I considered to be a real diamond in the rough. I bought my parts from Jim Carter’s, and turned the project over to pro restorer Monty King at King’s Restorations in Cloverdale, Virginia so the body would be done right. The truck has been slowly and meticulously restored over the last ten years and is in near-perfect, near-show-quality condition. The list of items purchased from Jim Carter’s is extensive. This is a ground-up restoration. All body parts were removed and sand-blasted down to good steel. All rust was replaced with new steel, or the entire part was replaced if necessary. Minor cosmetics to the engine would make it a show truck. Body is perfect, mechanics excellent. Truck is very original and can be driven anywhere. It has 127,000 actual miles. It does not currently have a radio installed. All colors are authentic, Juniper Green and White two-tone exterior, with two-tone interior of dark and light green. (Many thanks to the staff at Jim Carter’s for helping me get the exact colors!!!) I kept it as a 6 volt system and I have several original parts as spares. I have enjoyed the truck and the project. It is great to drive. My father-in-law was partly the reason I undertook the project, but he passed away shortly before it was completed. I would consider selling the truck to someone who would like to take it the last bit to perfection.

Mike Harness
Blacksburg, Virginia
(540) 951-2197
harness@vt.edu

1955 chevrolet first series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet first series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet first series pick up truck

1955 chevrolet first series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet first series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet first series pick up truck

1955 Chevrolet Second Series

Wednesday, January 1st, 2003

Owner: Mike Cargill – Fontana, CA

1955 chevrolet second series

This truck was purchased by my Grandfather in 1962 with 10,000 miles on it. It was used as a work truck by Grandfather until 1974 when it was given to my father. My father used it as a daily work truck until 1991 when he and I restored it.

1955 2nd series 3100 standard stepside, small rear window
235 6 cylinder
3 speed manual

Work done:

Paint – interior and exterior, re-chroming, new bed, rebuilt steering gearbox, refurbished flywheel, original engine without overhaul at 200,000 miles. About $2500 of work put into vehicle Future work: Window felt, seat to re-cover

There is no rust or damage. It is truly a family heirloom.

1955 chevrolet second series 1955 chevrolet second series 1955 chevrolet second series

1955 chevrolet second series

1955 Chevrolet Second Series

Sunday, December 1st, 2002

Owner: Keith Gunn

1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck

Thank you for allowing me to share my truck with you.

This is the only truck I have ever owned, and really the only kind of truck that ever held much interest for me. The first 1955 (second series) I ever saw was purchased by my best friend’s father. Not only did I think it beautiful, it was FAST!

While attending an auto show in South Carolina I saw a pristine restoration of a ’55 and asked the owner if he new of another that I might restore. He knew of one in Broadway, NC and so my story began.

My truck was purchased new in early 1956 from the Pinehurst Motor Co. in Pinehurst, NC and was loaded with just about every available option except automatic transmission. Since that time it has never been titled outside the state of North Carolina.

The truck had been partially disassembled for restoration, and parts were scattered in several farm outbuildings. It was loaded up and carried to Siler City, NC where I was fortunate enough to find interested people to work on the restoration.

The truck was then completely taken apart, sandblasted and re-assembled on the fresh chassis. My goal was to retain the original appearance while at the same time achieving a roadworthy vehicle. I hope you enjoy the results.

Jim Carter Truck Parts was my primary parts supplier. The parts department, was most helpful with service and advise, especially Sheba Queen and Kelly Mitchell. I am also grateful to my friends, without, whose assistance the restoration could not have been done in less than a year, if at all. Special thanks to Larry Holder, Dale Testerman, Bobby Lambert, and Luis Borrayo.

Specifications:

Engine ‘ 305 CI small block Chevy with Edlebrock intake and Quadrajet 4 barrel carb.
Electrical ‘ 12 volt w/alternator
Brakes ‘ Dual master cylinder, power assist.
Transmission ‘ 3 speed syncromesh column shift
Cooling ‘ Stock original heavy duty radiator and high volume fan
Interior Cooling ‘ Vintage Air
Glass ‘ Tinted
Paint ‘ Chrysler Patriot Blue (PB-7) basecoat/clearcoat
Wheels ‘ Deep dish with mid-50’s police hubcaps and trim rings
Tires ‘ Michelin 235/75-15

You may contact Keith Gunn at kpba@aol.com

1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck

1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck

1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck

1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck 1955 chevrolet second series pick up truck

Buy Parts for 1947 to 1955 Trucks