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Posts Tagged ‘changes’

Early Gas Tank Changes

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the three years of this cab design, subtle changes occurred as GM engineers learned better ways to construct this truck. The gas tank changes on the pickup body style was probably the most obvious and it was different each of the three years.

In 1936, the new mid year low cab pickup continued with the earlier practice of securing the tank under the bed and behind the rear axle. The gas add spout extended through a hole in the lower bed side behind the right rear fender. Thought it might seem like a good location, it was not. Considering the trucks stiff suspension the poor roads of the 1930’s, and how rough trucks were treated, this location resulted in tanks leaks and cracked fuel lines that were over 6 feet from the engine.

The answer to this problem came out in the 1937 trucks. The tank was moved to the protected area under the cab seat cushion. This solved prior problems but the improvement did not go far enough. The fuel add hole was in the top of the tank on the passenger side. To gain access to the threaded plug to add fuel, the right side of a new split bottom cushion was raised or removed. Rain or shine, the passenger would stand outside and wait for fueling so the seat cushion could be replaced. Of course, any accidental spills or splashing from the spout would give fumes within the cab till the evaporation was complete. What if you lit a cigarette out of habit? What about a small electrical short under the dash? Your imagination can tell you what probably happened a few times over the years.

The engineers seem to have got it together in mid 1938. They redesigned the 1937 tank and cab so that gasoline was added through a spout that now extended out the cab corner. The bottom seat cushion was then one piece, however, for several months two piece bottoms were still used on the assembly line until supplies were exhausted. Therefore, the late 1938 tank was used less than one year and is very rare today. The new designed 1939 body style continued with this type tank and cab design but the 39 tank will not interchange in the earlier cab.

early gas tank changes 1

1937 ( above)

early gas tank changes 2

1937 (above)

early gas tank changes 3

1937 (above)

early gas tank changes 4

1937 (above)

early gas tank changes 5

1938 (above)

early gas tank changes 6

1938 (above)

early gas tank changes 7

Gas Spout Hole from Outside

early gas tank changes 8

Gas Spout Hole from Inside

WWII Cab Changes

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

With the US entry into World War II, trucks were quickly modified to be successful for military use. Pre-existing cabs, frames, and mechanical components were altered to be more usable when in everyday work duties or in battle.  NOTE:  The Chevrolet cab remains almost the same as those on civilian trucks.

WWII Cab 1
This photo shows a large military truck that was built by the Chevrolet Division of General Motors about 1941.  The items of much interest are the changes made for use overseas and when the truck was in the field.

WWII Cab 2

The horn button is of a very heavy duty basic design, not like on most civilian trucks.  Only the civilian ‘cab-over-engine’ body carried this style horn button on non-military vehicles.

WWII Cab3

Note: This is a civilian Chevrolet cab with many modifications. The windshield frame is operated differently. Its hinges are on the outside for easy repair. There is no crank-out assembly that is known for their short life. The frame is opened manually much like the trucks before 1936. The crank handle hole is not even punched in the dash panel.

WWII Cab 5

The crank handle hole is not punched in the dash panel.  The windshield frame is secured in the closed position by a simple wedge handle.

WWII Cab 6

The cab rear window is well protected with an exterior steel grill. We suspect many private owners would have liked this extra on their domestic trucks.

WWII Cab 6

The inside door and window handles are not die-cast due to the war time shortage of zinc. They are made of a steel stamping covered with a dull Bakelite molded material. This usually shrinks and cracks within a few years.

WWII Cab 7

The removable hood side panels are of extra thickness to protect the engine from enemy rifle fire.  The Chevrolet lettering was removed after 1941 to stop extra advertising.

WWII Cab 9

The windshield and hood have exterior hinges for easy accessibility if damaged overseas.

1960-1966 Chevrolet Hood Changes

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1960 1966 hood changes 1

The two distinct styles of hoods during this seven year series (1960-1961 and 1962-1966) were each the same for Chevrolet and GMC except for one slight difference. The spot welded insert across the front (5″ x 82″) is a different stamping for Chevrolet than for GMC. This created a changed appearance with less expense!

Because of this different insert the two trucks have park light lenses that will not interchange. For economic reasons the 1960-1961 style hood was soon discontinued by GM. After the mid 1970’s, if the dealer ordered a 1960-1961 hood, he was sent the 1962-1966 style. It fit the older design truck perfectly.

For the non-perfectionist, all 1960-1966 GMC and Chevrolet hoods will interchange.

1960-1966 hood changes 2 1960-1966 hood changes 3 1960-1966 hood changes 4

1960-1966 hood changes 5 1960-1966 hood changes 6