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Posts Tagged ‘interior’

GMC Super Custom Interiors

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

super custom interiors

GMC Super Custom Interiors offer the ultimate in comfort and style, including plush bucket seats with vinyl covering and matching center seat concole. The GMC Super Custom also includes appearance and comfort options from special horn button to carpeted floor.

1958-1959 Deluxe Interior

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

It is sometimes asked by restorers, ‘What is the correct fabric for a 1958 Chevrolet Cameo or other deluxe cabs in 1958-59?’ Answer: The same cloth material was used on the top of the line seats and door panels throughout both years. Yes, the last year of the Cameos, discontinued at about mid 1958, used the same cloth as the deluxe non-Cameo cabs.

The following pictures show this interior material on a 1958 Cameo door panel, a 1959 Chevrolet deluxe cab with 12,000 original miles, and on a page from the 1959 Chevrolet Salesman’s Data Book.

This data is not known by many 1958 Cameo restorers and it does give them more places to obtain the correct material. As this material was used two years, upholstery shops having left-over partial rolls may have this rare upholstery material in storage!

1958 1959 deluxe interior 1

1958 1959 deluxe interior 2

1958 1959 deluxe interior 3

1958 1959 Deluxe Interior Informational Chart PDF version. Click Here

1947-1953 Dash

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

When observing restored 1947-1953 Advanced Design trucks, we rarely see the removable dash parts painted correctly. Though at least half the owners paint these parts to their personal taste, many truck restorers want the dash appearance as original. Surprisingly, we rarely see two alike even on trucks that are said to be restored just like they left the factory.

The following is factory correct! With a little extra effort your dash can look just like what the original owner saw 50 years ago.

1947 to Late 1951

This is the early years of the series before the Korean War shortages. At this time, chrome and stainless steel trim was used more abundantly.

The glove box door has a stainless outer ribbed skin and the upper and lower speaker grille horizontal trim strips are stainless. To create the original look, polish the speaker grille trim plus top and bottom wide glove door ridges to a mirror finish. Paint the speaker grille, ash tray cover, plus the remainder of glove box door interior cab color.

Now comes the detail work. Cut masking tape the width of the valleys between the smaller ridges. Put in position after placing the tape on your pant leg to reduce the sticky surface. You don’t want to take the paint off when you remove the tape later. Next comes the silver paint. This is placed over the small ridge tops on both the speaker grille and glove box door. The result is similar appearing horizontal ridges nicely running between the two dash items just like GM produced them.

1947 dash 1

Late 1951-1953

These are the years of the Korean War shortages. The glove box door, ash tray cover, and horizontal radio speaker grille trim were stamped from earlier tooling, however, were now changed to painted steel. They are all interior color and there is not even silver paint on the horizontal ridges. Therefore, if you have these years, restoration is easy. Just paint these items cab interior color and your job is done!   NOTE:  The following image is from a 1953 Suburban which has the red and brown interior.  The pickup has the more metallic medium brown interior paint which will be like this Suburban except for the color.

1947 dash 2

GMC Blank Out

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Between 1954 and 1959 the dash cluster of GMC trucks were given a circular opening for a dealer installed clock or tachometer. These trucks left the factory with a blank-out plate to fill this opening. With most GMC’s this plate always remained in place as an option was rarely added.

The enclosed photo shows both plates used during the period. We are requesting help to identify the years each were used. Contact us for your opinion at www.oldchevytrucks.com

gmc blank out

1947-1955 Suburban Interiors

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Since their beginning in 1935, the Chevrolet Suburban was always the “people hauler” of General Motors commercial fleet of trucks. They were designed to carry more weight on rough roads than was the passenger car station wagon. While trucks were carrying freight from the time of their purchase, Suburban’s were reserved for passengers! It became an immediate success with the military, as a school bus on smaller rural routes, for transporting people from train and bus stations to hotels, etc.

After WWII, the Advance Design Suburban body design (introduced in 1947) began to attract more individual owners for family transportation needs. To better provide this with limited expense, General Motors added just a few extras for appearance. This was tan rubber floor mats and a two tone painted interior. Neither was like what was on the pickup or large trucks.

The Suburban interior colors are Pecan Brown and Wicker Brown. This all harmonized with the brown headliner, floor mat and seat upholstery. All makes a nice interior package with little extra expense to GM.

The following should help the restorer have an even a better idea of the 1947-53 Advance Design Suburban when new. Photos are of a 1953 untouched Suburban that was left with original paint and used as a fire department ambulance in Lamont, Illinois. Photos taken about 2005 after being bought from the city of Lamont.

Because General Motors always kept production cost as low as possible on truck related models, they designed the Suburban on the pre-existing 1/2 ton pickup chassis as well as using the same sheet metal on its doors, front end, and dash. To dress up the body for passengers, GM added these extra appearance features not found on their trucks. Though these additions were nice, they were still a long way from the appointments on the cars and station wagons being sold in the same dealerships.

The door panel frames and removable interior window trim of the 1947-53 are a shade darker, Wicker Brown as in photo E. Even the seat frames were also this darker brown, photo f. The seat upholstery is brown Spanish grain while trucks in 1947-1953 were maroon. The cardboard door panels match the seat texture and color. The tan floor mats and red brown door windlace colors are Suburban only.

The lighter Pecan Brown was placed on the body sheet metal that became part of the total assembly. This is inner quarter panels, doors, dash, tailgate or double doors, and front seat riser. All was painted at one time after being welded together as a single unit. See Photos.

One very different touch on the Suburban over the truck is the color of the seven horizontal ridges on their 1947-1951 dash. Note picture A and B. These ridges are the color of the darker interior trim. Photo C shows the truck (not Suburban) dash ridges which were silver to closely match the upper and lower dash horizontal stainless.

By 1952-1953 the dash stainless had been exchanged for painted steel due to Korean War shortages. Then both the Suburban and truck dashes were without contrasting colors but still kept overall interior coloring. See photo D.

In 1954-1955 the Suburban and truck body shared a new redesigned dash panel and the interior body colors were also changed. The two body styles now used the same pearl beige color on their interior metal. A medium brown Spanish grain vinyl was on the seats of both body styles. Contrasting color interior window frames were not on the 1954-1955 Suburban as seen on earlier Advance Design models. They were the color of the main body panels.

If you have decided to restore your rare early Advance Design Suburban as it left the factory, these tips can separate the men from the boys in serious judging. To some it may be just as important for the daily driver.

1947 1955 suburban interiors 1

Photo A (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 2

Photo B (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 3

Photo C (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 4

Photo D (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 5

Two Tone Door Panel (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 6

Photo E (above)

1947 1955 surburban interiors 7

Photo F (above)

1965 Chevy Deluxe Suburban

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the mid 1960’s many Americans began to request deluxe features on trucks. More disposable income put extra items in reach for many households. GM recognized this area for more income and began adding more extra cost options.

The popular standard Suburban could be transformed into a more family vehicle by offering exterior trim and upgrading the interior. It would be even better for a family vehicle as well as pulling a boat or travel trailer. Highways were being improved and Americans wanted to see the country.

A more deluxe Suburban emerged in the 1960’s. To same GM costs, most components were simply from the top of the line Chevrolet pickup. Even the side trim was from the fleetside pickup. It only had length differences and the word “Custom” was engraved on each side.

Following are pictures of a rare 1965 deluxe Suburban. The outside is all original except for new paint. The interior had recently been changed so the attached photo is from an original salesman’s data book showing a deluxe pickup. The nicer appearing and more comfortable cushions also apply to the deluxe Suburban. Note the deluxe steering wheel (actually GM used this from a 1960 Impala), trim band on the glove box door, and the two tone color pattern on door panels.

1965 chevy suburban 1

Chrome bumper and anodized grill (above)

1965 chevy suburban 2

The rear appears to have no changes from the standard model other that the chrome bumper (above)

1965 chevy suburban 3

The upper side anodized aluminum trim is the same as the deluxe pickup except for the length differences. Even the short from spear starting the trim strip is the same as the pick up (above)

1965 chevy suburban 4

Note the word CUSTOM etched on the side trim (above)

1965 chevy suburban 5

Suprising, the windshield rubber does not hold stainless trim (above)

1965 chevy suburban 6

Custom comfort interior (above)

1965 chevy suburban 7

Deluxe Steering Wheel (above)

1962 GMC Deluxe Suburban

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Suburbans ‘ people haulers on a 1/2 ton truck chassis. Not designed for truck freight, the successful Suburban was created to move people. They quickly gained popularity among the military, as crew haulers for companies, and for small rural school buses.

By the 1960’s, GM began to expand their Suburban market to attract families. To many this would be a great heavy-duty family car. A more deluxe Suburban model was introduced. The exterior trim and well appointed interior defiantly showed this model was not for commercial use.

These pictures of a 1962 top of the line GMC Suburban show the unique trim that was placed on this model. It is for GMC only ‘ not Chevrolet. Though Chevrolet shared the same body and some chassis parts; trim, interior, and colors were different so each brand could be individual.

Look closely and see how the GMC brand kept their cost of side trim to a minimum. Other than the curves around the front door windows, straight pieces of aluminum trim make up the package. The more obvious economy steps are on the rear quarter panel. Note vertical and horizontal trim strips simply butt together. They also act as paint divider strips for the two-tone paint combination of the GMC. The die cast chrome ‘custom’ emblem in the same as on the GMC pickup.

This is an excellent example of a very original GMC Suburban interior. The woven green seat material is as it was 40 years ago. The right jump seat swings up and forward to gain access to the rear. Note how the middle seat is shorter so that the passengers can walk to the rear.

Today, even finding a 1960-1966 GMC Suburban is rare but locating one with this deluxe custom package is almost impossible.

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1960-1966 GMC Deluxe Suburban Seats

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The seats on this 1962 GMC Suburban are pure factory original. Their shape is designed for only the Suburban body. They allow for access to the rear seat.

Horizontal white vinyl in the back rest is characteristic of many GM vehicles during this era. It was an extra touch that added a little extra flair to the deluxe models.

1960 gmc deluxe seats 1

1960 gmc deluxe seats 2

1960 gmc deluxe seats 3

1960 gmc deluxe seats 4

1960 gmc deluxe seats 5

Hammered Interior Paint 1940-46

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During 1940-46 the Chevrolet GMC trucks came standard with an unusual interior paint. It added a little extra appearance with minimum extra expense. This has been referred to as “Hammered Paint”. While drying this paint develops a fish eye appearance. This helped make up just a small amount for no cloth door panels or related extras found on GM cars. After all, trucks were for work.

On these years of GM trucks all removable interior sheet metal is given this hammered paint. It includes the dash, windshield posts, door panels, rear cab sheet metal, Etc. The specialty paint is available from Jim Carters Classic Truck Parts and a few other full stocking dealers as follows using our part numbers:  Chevrolet PT106  –  GMC PT133.

Here is the story on our 1940-46 interior paint. Thought I should share some of the facts of how it happened. About 25 years ago I purchased a NOS glove box door. If I was ever going to match the color, this is what I would need. (Possibly just setting in a dark store room for 50 years might cause a chemical change to the paint pigment. Don’t know) No other parts supplier, then or now, wanted any part of making hammered paint. No takers when we ask anyone to do it. Finally, the Randolph Paint Co. in New Jersey almost 25 years ago, offered to try to produce it in quarts with very high quantities.

The product they created seemed to be very close. Maybe within 10% of the NOS glove box lid. Our relationship lasted well until 2014 when they either went out of business or just no longer had an interest. The paint hunt was on again!

By then we discovered a national brand starting to produce hammered paint in quarts in several colors. One they called bronze and we used it! It later was found to have a little too much silver but it was all there was. We marketed many quarts for several years, however some perfectionists made negative comments about the extra silver in the hammered texture.

One last attempt would be made to be correct: Then a new idea emerged. A quart was taken to a local auto body paint store with a slight color change in mind. The employees had not heard of hammered paint and wanted no part of the project. Fortunately, the owner was in and we had bought from him for 30 years. So at our cost, he would give it a try with an additive.

Wow, with added tints, we met with what we felt was a success. The NOS glove box door was sold almost 20 years ago however, the color seemed very close. No perfect examples we can trust remain that we have found.

So this is what we market today. Much better than the Randolph Paint Co. days. Is it perfect? Probably not. Seventy year old NOS parts could have faded slightly even in a box. It is all we have but we think it is near show quality. We have made quantities in quarts and now spray cans. It only receives compliments from our customers! It is just “slightly” darker than the two photos of the old Randolph Paint shown in this article.

NOTE: It appears GMC wanted to be just a little different on their interior color. We finally created this tint in a separate part#. See Above.

hammered 1

hammered 2

hammered 3

Interior Colors, Chevrolet 1940-46

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Serious early truck restorers often ask ‘What is the interior color of the original cab sheet metal parts, versus the exterior color?’ The answer for the 1934-46 trucks is simple.

The removable panels from the cab interior were always the inside color. If a component was welded in as part of the cab structure, it was sprayed the exterior color during the total cab painting.

This allowed successful coating of interior panels. As they could be placed flat during painting, there was a better guarantee of success for their specialty coatings. Wrinkle surface was placed on 1936-38 and a hammered appearance was used on most 1940-46 models.

Examples of these removable panels are the dash, rear interior corners, wiper covers, interior door panels, the above windshield cover, and upper door frames.

The outer cab color will also cover the seat riser and firewall as these were part of the total assembly. One exception is the rocker panels below the door. They are attached to the cab with screws but are the exterior color.

The two removable floor sections (covered with the floor mat) appear to be their own color, a black primer.

It is interesting that the interior colors in the finished new cab could have been painted even in different states and then the parts shipped to the assembly plant.

The following photos are of an all original 1941 Chevrolet truck interior.

exterior color 1
Removable dash, Interior color

exterior color 2
Removable rear panels. Interior color.

rxterior color 3
Welded in panels at factory. Exterior color.

exterior color 4
All of door exterior color, except inter removable panel which is interior color.