Jim Carter's Old Chevy Trucks - Classic Chevy & GMC Truck Parts for all of your restoration needs! 1000's of parts in stocks now!

Posts Tagged ‘1951’

1951 Chevrolet Suburban

Sunday, January 6th, 2019

Featured Truck of the Month 2019 starts off with a bang! We are offering a different way of showing this special truck. We hope you enjoy the video, background music and the detailed description as much as we did putting it all together.

This Advanced Designed Suburban was rebuilt by Mike and Tyler Chance a father/ son team devoted to their business of restoring early Chevy Trucks and Ford Mustangs. This is one of so many vehicles they have completely restored over the, 18 years in business. This 1951 Chevy Suburban is a real stand out for any GM Truck enthusiast.

Mike the founder of the restoration company stated: “This type of a custom truck was sometimes seen in the 1960’s. No structural changes and the mechanicals appear almost factory original.” The first differences you see will be the unique color arrangement and extra chrome under the hood. The gray pleated material on the seats are a plus as well as the carpeting. They give it the extra touch!

Yes, it is upgraded with a 1957 six cylinder 235 engine (an easy drop in) and slightly higher ratio differential. It will now cruise at 70 MPH with traffic on the open road!

Notice a few little extras that places this suburban a cut above so many others.

GM Dealer Installed in the mid-1950s:

  • Rear turn signal lights when you requested this new option
  • Grill guard from side to side above the bumper. Very rare!
  • GM tissue holder under dash

Aftermarket extras that could have been added by the owner.

  • Fenton Exhaust Headers, and in this example, have been polished and chrome plated as well as the intake manifold
  • Wolf Wistle operated by vacuum from the middle of the intake manifold.
  • Six-hole wheels are from a 1937-1941 Chevy ¾ ton. Nice Extra!
  • White wall tires
  • Stereo System disguised by an in-dash copy of a real Chevy radio.
  • Left door hand operated spot light. Great for seeing house numbers and strange things along the road.

 

A very unique feature is adding a 1963 and newer 3 speed transmission that is synchronized in all three gears, not just 2nd and 3rd as original. Even more unusual is the modified shift linkage. It still remains a column shift much like when it left the factory. There is one exception! To correctly allow it to still use the factory steering column and shift lever an unusual modification was needed. After the two linkage rods were remade between the transmission and gear shift box, the quadrant position had to be reversed. This moved 2nd gear to the lower right and the higher gear to the upper corner. This requires a 180 degree design change from the original factory transmission.

Mike’s interest in older vehicles comes from his father’s hobby of collecting older cars and trucks. At times he has had over 50 unique special interest vehicles. Now, at 85, his father has kept his two favorites. A 1955 Chevy car and a 1972 Chevy ½ ton pickup both of which he drives regularly. In addition he walks and jogs about 10 miles each week. What a great example to all of us. Mike and Tyler, has some big shoes to fill in being involved in this restoration company.

Their GM truck and Mustang restoration business is in a large airplane hangar near the Fort Worth, TX area. The airport is still an active for light aircraft. Some other adjacent hangars store antique airplanes and some additional car storage. It’s a little like following Jay Leno who has a similar car workshop and display area in an airplane hangar located in Burbank, California airport.

Mike said the Suburban was originally bought and used on a large farm in California as a family and worker hauler. Somehow it found its way to Texas, where Mike saw it at the large Pate Swap Meet near Fort Worth. He was so impressed he bought it on the spot!

Almost no body rust made it a real find. Much less time, money, and labor to make it the way it is shown in this video. You can spot the many extras in the body color, redesigned interior and extra chrome. The Suburban has been changed by following what might have been available in the 1960’s.

Look at Mike and Tyler’s Video on this 1951 Suburban. We think you will find it quite interesting. (Don’t forget there are two videos to see it all.)

The following are the words of Mike Chance on his love for the old Chevy trucks

“Having grown up in Abilene, Texas in the 1970’s, I was familiar with Chevrolet trucks of the early to late 1950’s.  They were so well built that many of them were still doing time. Almost everyone I knew had owned one or knew someone who had. As I grew older I grew more and more fond of these uniquely American workhorses. For me, it was interesting to watch the truck morph from just above tractor status to a legitimate dual purpose vehicle capable of rivaling the car as a transportation choice. 

Back in the early 1950’s, the Carry All was the ultimate people transporter. It exceeded the typical car’s capacity by at least two people.  When I saw this 1951 model at the Pate swap meet in Fort Worth, Texas I purchased it on the spot. It had benefited from a quality restoration and was a real eye-catcher. Better than that was the fact that it was capable of providing on demand fun by loading it with friends for delightful excursions.

It had been upgraded to a late model 235 engine along with a high-speed rear end and power disc brakes the combination of which allowed it to be driven at high way speeds with confidence. 

Always looking for the next thrill, I ultimately sold it. Had I known that I would one day have 11 grandkids I would have never sold it. I am now back in the hunt for its replacement.

I still LOVE old trucks and currently own a 1959 Apache “double deluxe”. My grandkids call it Apache Red.  It’s a factory 283 engine with some mild updates for drivability. My wife and I drive it almost every day.  We recently added Vintage Air to help us get through the hot Texas summers.

I have other collector cars, but the old trucks have my heart. It seems like everyone loves an old Chevy truck. My personal taste runs more to stock original presentations with some mild updates for reliability and safety.  If it has a 235, 261 or 283 in it, I am a fan.

Michael Chance lives in the DFW area of Texas and buys, sells and updates Classic Cars. His website is MyRod.com This video is just one of several he has done on classic truck ownership and is currently working on one to describe his idea of the “perfect mix” of originality with a few critical updates for drivability. “

Our 1951 Chevy Suburban In Action

Video 1
https://www.youtube.com/embed/Bsq9NS-zjRQ
Video 2
https://www.youtube.com/embed/DOUwiTYYVTc

WOW! Look at Mike’s immediate family in and around this older 1940’s Plymouth convertible.

1951 Chevrolet ¾ Ton (BIG RED)

Tuesday, May 1st, 2018

It is rare that we see a transformation that has occurred like this 1951 Chevrolet ¾ ton pickup. It was changed from being a parts truck to a national show winner among some very stiff competition.  It has become a step above the quality on the day it left the dealership 65 years ago.  The owner, Dr. Fred Young of Moorestown, New Jersey is the one initially responsible for it reaching this level.

The adventure began about 15 years ago. Fred’s interest in older vehicles had been growing over the years. To restore an older 1950’s vehicle was what he wanted.  It would be a complete change of pace over his daily routine but maybe this is what made it so rewarding!

 

 

Why a pickup? Fred was told by a vehicle hobbyist that pickups were less complicated to restore, and would be a good starter vehicle. Who ever said that did not realize how deep Fred and his restoration technician were going to get into this project or the poor condition this new acquisition would be. Greenie, as Fred first called it, was because of its original Seacrest Green color.

 

           

 

 

 

 

 

It had been on a working farm (used and abused) near Danville, VA for 49 years. The older it got, the less it was taken care of, until it had almost reached the parts truck category.

No windshield (caused interior damage), a metal plate covered the rotten wood and cross sills, 3 fenders a total loss, and enough caked mud and dirt removed to start a 50’ x 50’ vegetable garden. Yes, the farmer had tried to keep the body going by just covering the rust with Bondo.  Oops, he had forgot to add enough antifreeze one winter so the truck’s replacement 235 engine (1954-55) had a 10” crack in the block that was spot-welded by the other owner.

                                                                                                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

A major restoration always begins with disassembly. Fred jumped right into this project with no hesitation.  This is what he had been looking forward to before his retirement.  He worked on it hours a day discovering the abuse it had experienced.  He began with the preliminary restoration work such as paint and dirt removal (a big job), and begin buying the new parts that would be needed soon.  With the paint removed to bare metal, Fred renamed Greenie to the Silver Monster!  With so many parts now spread over his garage, he began to realize maybe he was beyond his ability as a first time restorer.  He wanted to enjoy driving this truck and not just be restoring it during all of his retirement years.

                                                                       

He began to visit the body shops in Danville for help and all four said the same thing. “We do not do restoration work anymore.  We have changed over to more profitable insurance work and our employees do not have the skills to satisfy older car’s owners.”

 

 

Fortunately, Fred’s research found one of the most knowledgeable persons in the country on 1947-1955 (Advance Design) Chevy/GMC trucks.  Bob Alder of Stephentown, New York, has about the top reputations in this field.  Bob has his own restoration shop, has built many show trucks, plus behind his building is over 100 early GM trucks for parts and research.  Also, he is a tech writer of restoration articles in national magazines on AD trucks.  These credentials could not be better!  Fred certainly found the best person to finish his pickup and Bob’s shop was only 150 miles away.  Better yet, he had a spot open for Fred’s Silver Monster!

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the paint removed, Fred towed it to Bob Adler Restoration Shop with all the parts he had accumulated. Bob did an excellent job over the next 18 months.  He even regularly emailed Fred showing him exactly what he was doing every few days.  What a nice touch!

 

 

 

 

 

The cab was removed immediately and set on a dolly until the chassis was completed. The cracked engine block needed a replacement. No problem for Bob.  He went out back to his massive collection of Advanced Design Trucks and picked the correct Thriftmaster 216 cubic inch engine that was pure 1951. What restoration shop in the world could have done this?

The same was the truck’s two doors. They were beyond salvaging.  Once again, Bob was about 200 feet from his door collection and made a quick exchange.

Once the 18 month project was complete Fred had a brand new 65 year old truck! Certainly a sight to behold.  It was then christened with a new and final name.  To Fred it will always go by “Big Red”.  It does have some factory options.  Fred chose Swift’s Red as the exterior color.  This is one of the optional 12 colors that year.  The interiors of all 1947-52 trucks were a gray-brown with slight metallic.

White wall tires were a non-factory option. In 1951 any Chevrolet dealer would have been glad to take a new non-sold showroom ready truck down the street to a tire store and exchange for a set of more “attention getting” tires (to get a sale).

 

  

One photo below shows this ¾ ton pickup has a 3 speed shift lever on the steering column. Most pickups of this size came with the optional 4 speed floor shift transmission as the plans were to use them for hauling heavier loads.  Thus, it is questioned if the very first owner in 1951 was on a farm or the farmer got a sweet lower price but that answer is lost in history.

Fred requested the option chrome grill with Waldorf white back splash bars and stainless around the windshield and door windows. The chrome hood ornament and bumper guards were Chevrolet dealer items and add a little extra sparkle.

 

AWARDS

While Fred’s “Big Red” was at its very best he decided to take it to serious judging shows in 2012 sponsored by the Vintage Chevrolet Club of America (VCCA). He received more than three major awards over a three year period, including First Junior, Senior, and Preservation awards in their Commercial Class.  One of the larger 2013 shows in Lawrence, NY, “Big Red” was recognized as the Best Commercial at the show!

So this is an overview of a very large pickup with humble beginnings; saved from almost being sent to the salvage yard. What a second act for a hardworking truck from Virginia.

 

Contacts for the above are:

Fred Young – ybarbfred@AOL.com

Bob Adler – bobadler@NYCAP.RR.COM

 

                                                             

1951 Chevrolet Suburban

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

test

What a unique 1951 Chevrolet Suburban for our Feature Truck Series! It is certainly a one of a kind. The owners are Jeff & Brenda Kuhn of Plainfield, Illinois. Their dream is now complete after 4 years in the making. The goal was to restore or find a totally original Suburban and then add special performance features that were usually available during the 1950’s and 1960’s with a few modern features. Here are the results. It is not only a “show stopper” where ever it is seen but it easily keeps up with freeway traffic even with its 60 year old inline 6 cylinder engine.

Here is a big plus, Jeff’s wife Brenda is great supporter of his enthusiasm in the old GM truck hobby. She gets involved!

Jeff has been a lover of Advance Design (1947-1955) Chevrolet / GMC trucks most of his life, even long before he married Brenda in his 40th year. At that time his interest was very strong in drag racing late model stocks cars, which he built and raced personally on local dirt tracks. Now the racing has been placed aside and he is totally into the hobby of Advance Design ruck enjoyment. He has owned and rebuilt over 10 of these trucks since he stopped dirt track racing. He puts them together in such a unique way that other truck enthusiasts just want to own them. It was not always the plan but sometimes offers come very difficult to turn down. His last, a 1948 Chevy ½ ton, was quoted to a potential buyer at above the six figure amount just so it would not sell. Well, it sold anyway! Therefore, don’t price your truck unless you really want to sell it. Probably a good selling point for this 1948 pickup was that it had been the feature truck in 8 national automotive magazines! Yes, Jeff knows how to create very special Advance Design trucks.

The dream that had been in Jeff and Brenda’s mind was to rebuild an early Suburban. With the sale of the 1948 pickup the money was available to make a Suburban into the vehicle they had hoped for. He discovered this Suburban 4 years ago. It was found in Wichita, Kansas and had been totally restored over 20 years exactly like it came from the factory. It had the correct Seacrest Green paint, all the seats were covered with the proper brown Spanish Grain vinyl, and even the grill back splash bars had been painted the proper Waldorf white.

Jeff and Brenda had always thought of having a Suburban because they can take other couples to car shows or just go out for fun. The changes Jeff added to this “people hauler” allows it to stay up with traffic at most any speed, and keep the engine at a lower RPM, and have an easy smooth ride.

The interesting surprise: No body cutting or frame alterations: The all stock body, windows, paint, interior, engine block, and most accessories are like it came from the dealership 60 years ago.

Here are some of the Suburban modifications available 50 and 60 years ago and a few that are very modern updates.
Engine: 1957 Chevrolet 235 high oil pressure inline six cylinder, however, there are some changes on the top end. Jeff added Fenton dual intake and exhaust manifolds. The two exhaust and tail pipes plus mufflers are all stainless steel and correctly run along only one side of the frame rail.

The two carburetors on the Fenton intake are early Zeniths from a GMC, not the original type Rochester’s. This provides a lean burn system with the correct amount of fuel to the engine. Thus, no high lift cam shaft required.

To catch more attention at shows when the hood is raised, Jeff found a Wayne polished aluminum valve cover and side plate for the 235 engine. (This was a high performance supply company in the 1950’s) What a nice touch!

Transmission: Jeff discovered this special transmission in his many years of racing and rebuilding Advance Design trucks. This 5 speed overdrive is the main feature that allows this Suburban to stay with fast moving traffic. It is manufactured by the Tremec Company and fits perfectly against the 1951 bell housing. Even the original clutch pressure plate and flywheel are still used. Only its fine spline input shaft requires a different hub on the clutch plate!

Differential: Jeff added a complete drum to drum assembly from a 1958 Chevy ½ ton. (He keeps 6 bolt wheels) This allowed him to remove the stock 3.90 ratio ring and pinion and exchange with a 3.38 ratio system. It gives about a 20% lower engine RPM. Another nice touch! This 1958 differential attaches to an open drive line system that is needed to connect to the above described modern Tremec 5 speed overdrive transmission.

Front Axle: A 4 inch “dropped” axle is just like they did it in the 1950’s. In addition the two leaf springs are multi leaf Posies brand called “Super Glide” and add another 3” drop.

Rear Suspension: By using special 1 ½ inch blocks between the axles and springs plus using Posies leaf springs the total lowering is about 4 ½ inches, not radical, but just right for this Suburban. Original hub caps are still used. The front and rear Posies springs make it ride like a passenger car!

Wheels: The 15 inch artillery wheels are a great copy of the 1937-45 Chevy ¾ ton six bolt units that have become so popular in recent years. However, these are modified so the calipers on the disc brakes do not rub them. Jeff found these at the Wheel Smith in Santa Ana, California.

Electronic Ignition: Here, Jeff went modern. He used a currently popular Pytronics electronic system. It is hidden inside the original distributer. He starts the old 235 engine now in a split second in even the coldest Illinois days.

Outside Trim: This was a major hunt! Originally on the deluxe panel truck as an option, but they fit a Suburban perfectly. A two year search found this set of trims and spears in Hawaii. The panel truck owner on the islands was building a street rod and decided to not use them (Probably because of their high value to a restorer!)

Jeff was soon the new owner and made the repairs to their scrapes and dings. He recalls his nervous feeling while drilling the 68 holes in the Suburban body for the trim clips and hoping they were placed in the correct position.

Fulton Sunvisor’s and Spotlight: Jeff got lucky on the Fulton Sunvisor. The windshield GM accessory is being reproduced just like they were in the 1950’s. The almost impossible item to locate is the Fulton side window visors. What a find for Jeff! Most of us would have no idea what they were if not in an original box. Another lucky find is the amber lens fog lights. They are now being reproduced to exactly copy those sold 60 years ago! They look great on the Suburban.

Interior: Just look at the authentic inside. This Suburban is mid-1951 due to the lack of bright work on the dash. (Korean War Shortages) Some accessories include tissue dispenser below dash, radio, flash light on steering column, right sunvisor and factory fresh air heater.

Front Protection: This single horizontal bar design was a very rare dealer installed accessory offered from 1951 through 1953. Chevrolet defined it as a “Radiator Grill Guard”. Not only attractive, but designed to protect the grill and radiator from minor accidents on or off the road.

Jeff and Brenda Kuhn certainly have a one of a kind Suburban. It’s a mixture of the old and new, and is great fun to drive. There is no doubt, it will be their keeper for many years. For once they have a 60 year old vehicle that does not have to be trailered. Just turn the key and go! It’s a part of automotive history for all to see.
You can Contact Jeff and Brenda at ohsolow48@yahoo.com.

test
Engine on display

test
Closed gates

test
Open Gates

test
The trim and spears make it complete!

test
GM’s idea: Lower the mirror arm to protect it’s glass from an open wing vent

test
Suburban dealer installed accessory rear turn signal light

test
Side view of dual Zeniths, manifolds, and filters

test
Wayne valve cover and side plate

test
Mounted on firewall instead of intake because of the slope of the Fenton manifold

test
A photo view of front Fulton sunvisor

test
The left edge of the front Fenton visor

test
“Very” rare Fulton side window visor

test
Dual pipes on an inline six cylinder. Side by side just like they should be!

test
Accessory GM safety treads to prevent slips when running boards are wet

test
New Spanish Grain brown seat upholstery

test
Late 1951 dash. The Tremec 5 speed shifter is just right

1951 Chevrolet COE Tow Truck

Wednesday, August 31st, 2016
test

This month’s feature truck may be the only COE (cab over engine) short wheel base Advance Design Tow truck in existence! Most trucks that are tow vehicles are doomed to extinction once they begin their job of car and truck moving duties. They are worked everyday sun, rain, or snow to justify their expense of huge insurance, a driver, maintenance of the tow equipment, some jobs at night in dark places (more body damage), city and county license fees, etc.

Sheet metal rust and thus bad appearance develops as well as occasional body damage. By their 10th year most are retired. The later use of an older tow truck is limited! Their extra weight usually makes them a high candidate for the crusher.

The wrecker body on this month’s special truck was manufactured by W.T. Stringfellow Co. in Nashville, TN and installed new on the cab and chassis as received from the GM factory. We checked our computer on Google under W.T. Stringfellow and what a surprise! They show it based in Nashville, Tennessee at 125 North 12th Ave. as a corporation beginning in 1946. The company became inactive in 1987.

This 65 year old 1951 Chevrolet COE series 5100 (short 110” wheel base) is a rare tow truck survivor for one reason; It was owned from the beginning by a small Chevrolet dealership in Lyndon, Kansas. It was always stored inside and kept very clean to make a good impression to their Chevrolet customers. Plus it was only used for towing duties for this dealership, not a full time hauler.

It has been owned by Jim Carter of Jim Carter Truck Parts in Independence, Missouri for almost 25 years. (He found it beside a vendor booth at the annual Lawrence, Kansas Swap Meet and drove it home 60 miles) It has since been kept out of bad weather. Jim said, “We saved this big rig from eventually going to see God”. It is now a little part of our country’s history!

The first 6 months of owning it, Jim, plus the help of nearby Jerry’s Chevy Restoration Shop, stripped out the interior and put back to the new exact factory appearance. They even added the factory radio and fresh air heater. Paint was polished to a high shine and a few appropriate metal repairs were made. The towing rig on the back (yes, it operates like new) was sanded, primed and painted in white as the Chevrolet dealer had it so many years ago. The long decorative stainless rails on each side of the wrecker body were polished to a mirror finish.

Jim used this fancy tow vehicle every few weeks during the first years of owning it. Believe it or not, it was a fun pleasure vehicle but occasionally did a few actual tow duties. Jim says one of the most remembered moments occurred during my “single years” while driving this restored tow truck. On a casual date with ladies for the first time, it created quite
a surprise when this truck drove up to their home. “What is that?” was just the beginning of their comments, especially as they climbed up the steps to reach the cab. They loved it!

Another special memory was the attempt to find a parking space during a major local event. Thousands of cars were there and the closest parking lot to the event was full. “When I drove the tow truck by that full lot, attendants immediately dropped the ropes at the entrance and allowed my truck to enter! Yes, they actually thought I was there to tow a stranded car. What a hoot!”

Driving a COE like this is a real fun experience. Not only is it a great eye catcher but you look down on all the cars that are now smaller in today’s world! We refer to our special wrecker as “The Blue Hooker!”

Get ready for real memories if you drive on a rough gravel or dirt road. Even if you ride over a section of damaged concrete or asphalt on an otherwise smooth surface, the stiff suspension springs give very little movement when not hauling weight so a big bounce can be a part of the action. Wear a pad under your cap if you want to protect your head from the top of the cab!

Before Jim purchased the COE, almost 30 years ago the original low pressure 235 six cylinder engine had been replaced with the next series, a 235 high oil pressure engine. This gives it the additional horse power that makes it better in driving this 6,500 pound short wheelbase COE on the highway. Oh yes, it has a wheel base close to a VW Beetle so you can put it beside other cars in a shopping center parking lot.

One other feature! All the towing controls are in the cab. If you are ask to tow a car by yourself, you must personally climb up into the cab several times to safely and correctly lift the vehicle on its two wheels. Yes, drivers did this many times every day in the 1950’s and earlier. We doubt if there were any complaints. 15 years earlier, drivers would have used a “hand crank” on the side of the wrecker body. Yes, both ways rolled the cable onto the spool behind the cab and lifted a car or truck on its two wheels for towing.

The new “modern” way of lifting a vehicle (using the “Power Take-off on the side of the 4 speed transmission) allowed middle age drivers extra years of work before being forced to retire because of the difficult hand cranking!

test
The license say it all!

test
Hood up!

test
It made the cover of “Pickup ‘n Panels” magazine in August 1996

test
Split Rims with white painted edges. Looks like whitewalls!

test
Lay on the ground to get this photo

test
A close-up of the wrecker body. Even has the “tool box” attached to the floor.

test

test

These photos are from the “Salesman’s Data Book” that was issued to all salesman at the Chevrolet dealerships. This page features the 110” wheelbase COE as it would have been received by the Chevrolet dealer in Lyndon, Kansas. A short time later they installed the wrecker body ordered from the W.T. Stringfellow Company. All has remained as a package for 65 years.

1951 Chevrolet 1/2 Ton Pickup

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016
test

One of the lowest mile over 50 year old trucks in existence! A great example of what an older truck was like when it first came off the assembly line. It is owned by Gerald Cooper of Manassas, Virginia. He has almost 50 early vehicles in his collection but this ½ ton is a special vehicle to him. It is so untouched. Few of his collection can come close to being this factory original!

It was bought new by a relative in Pennsylvania and used mostly for hauling trash to a nearby landfill plus a few miscellaneous local projects. When Gerald bought it in 1993 it had 4,620 miles on its odometer. Since then it has mostly been in storage as he has other early vehicles in his collection to drive. It currently shows 6,105 due to taking it to some car shows and very limited pleasure drives. The great condition plus the miles shown on the oil change door post stickers all go along with the odometer being correct.

With these miles, it is understandable that it has the original Swifts Red paint. With polishing and a few touch-ups, the paint looks very good. The wheels were the item needing improvement. They were sanded, repainted and now look as good as the body paint. It is a standard cab (not deluxe pickup) because of no rear corner windows and painted outer grill bars.

One major accessory is the Chevrolet dealer installed heater. Of course, it was certainly needed by the first owner in Pennsylvania with their cold winters. The other accessory is the GM by-pass filter attached to the intake manifold.

Amazing! It still has its factory installed 600 x 16 tires. They are cracked in places but have never gone flat. This explains that the ½ ton was usually in storage and out of the hot summer sun.

Two non-GM accessories are the back-up light and add-on turn signals. These directional lights were added later by the owner to give more ease in driving. (Turn signals were not an option in 1951) However, it was during the late 1950’s that many private companies offered this add-on accessory kit. Usually sold at auto supply stores.

These rare low mileage trucks have a great plus for the perfectionist. If there is any disagreement on what is correct in a total original restoration trucks like this little 1951 ½ ton will give the answers.

You can contact Gerald@thestevepetty@gmail.com.

test
The 1949 to 1952 standard cabs usually had body color grill bars and white back-splash.
(See our website Grill Restoration tech article at www.oldchevytrucks.com)

test
Original 1951 tires, 600 x 16. Still no flats!

test
All original Swifts Red. Note: the GM by-pass oil filter on the intake manifold.

test
Painted gas cap to match the body. Correct?

test
The original one left side taillight (as it left the factory)

test
Maroon door panels to match the seats. Just right!

test
A perfect example of a factory dash. The horizontal strips are just right.
(See our tech article on this on our website. www.oldchevytrucks.com
Under interior)

test
Excellent Maroon vinyl seat covering.

test
All “bone stock” except the accessory turn signal switch.

Suburban Rear Quarter Panel Holes

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

The full rear quarter panels for the 1947-55 Chevy/GMC Suburban were made all the same at the metal stamping manufacturer.  To save money these panels were not made different if the Suburban was to have the double doors or the tailgate style opening in the rear.

Thus, when the Suburban was provided with a lift and tailgate combination the 4 holes for the “double barn door” hinges in the quarter panels were filled with rectangular rubber plugs.  This was not just for appearance but prevent rain water from reaching the body interior.

These photos show the plugs painted in body color; however it is questioned if this is correct.  By 1950, Suburban buyers had the choice of the 12 pickup colors.  It would have been more economical for all to have black rubber plugs instead of 12 boxes with the optional color prepainted plugs on the assembly line.

The other thought:  These plugs were painted when the full body was given its final color.  This would mean GM planned on the enamel body paint being of the quality that would successfully adhere to rubber over the years.  We don’t usually see this combination in other GM vehicles.  Special paint for rubber only is used!

Comments on how it really occurred:  Email us at jcarter@oldchevytrucks.com

Aftermarket Dual Rear Wheels

Monday, April 18th, 2011

What a unique invention. When you have a 1947 through 1959 single rear wheel 3/4 or 1 ton GM truck and need more pulling power, this is the answer. American ingenuity at its best!

This new steel center hub extension includes eight long bolts to reach the original wheel studs. This holds the factory wheel in place and then provides a threaded end for the original eight lug nuts which are holding another matching wheel.

The buyer of this aftermarket kit just had to be sure his new outer tire was the same height as the original inner tire.

Pictures and data from Scott Golding, Stratton, NE.
email: scottandbetty@hotmail.com

1951 Chevrolet Tilt A Whirl

Friday, April 16th, 2010
1951 Chevrolet Tilt a Whirl

Listed on Ebay during April 2010.
It sold for $3,495.00…
What a bargain for this piece of American History!

1951 Chevrolet Tilt A Whirl

This is a very unique one of a kind 1951 Chevrolet Tilt A Whirl style Carnival Amusement ride. This vehicle was used back in the day to go around the streets of New York to give rides for 5 cents to the kids who could not afford to go to a regular carnival or amusement park. Unbelievable history for what this truck represents. Basically it rode around and stopped for kids just like the ice cream trucks of today do.

This is a very rare vehicle that less than a handful were produced with only two that I know of, exist today. This is the true collectors vehicle. A one of a kind!!! Based on a 1951 Chevy Chassis with a 15,000lb GVWR this truck was built to be safe. Powered by a 6cyl straight engine and a manual shift transmission. The truck is in non running condition. This truck was stored for years and never started. The drivetrain will need to be completely gone through. The Ride portion is an actual amusement type Tilt A Whirl style ride with 6 cars a canopy, fence with an entrance and exit. This unit is 100% intact and fully operationable once the truck is running again to engage the PTO. The ride portion is in great shape and will need painting to put it back into shape. The truck itself will need to be restored to its former condition. The truck itself is very solid but will need some patches, repairs and mechanical work. The time, effort and money spent on this investment will pay off.

This truck is a true part of American history and is a sure bet high dollar collectable when completed. A true one of a kind….Everything is complete with the truck it will just need totally redone. The tires are all new, balanced and sealed holding air with no issues. If you are in the market for a rare one of a kind collectable look no further…A real head turner…

I believe the right person or Company could restore this vehicle relatively inexpensive. It will be more labor than anything. A very solid truck that is all there. Seems this could be a heck of a vehicle going across the Barrett Jackson Block…I truly had full intentions of redoing this vehicle. It could only bring fond meemories, smiles and happiness when completed and that is all few and far between today. The sky is truly the limit with this truck….In the right hands, redone this really could be the buy of the century!!! It would be impossible to measure the exact value of this collectors vehicle when completed. I have seen nothing like this to date. I believe restoration should be relatively easy, just bulky. Once the ride portion is removed you are looking at a cab and chassis to redo. the ride is 100% and will needs some repairs to the outside construction but the ride itself is all there and ready to function. It truly would be wonderful to see this vehicle up and operating once again….This world does need some joy and hapiness and nothing is like old times!!! This vehicle is 9’2″ tall 8′ wide and 24’10” wide.

  1951 Chevrolet Tilt a Whirl 1951 Chevrolet Tilt a Whirl 1951 Chevrolet Tilt a Whirl

1951 Chevrolet Wrecker

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Year/Make 1951 Chevrolet
Owner: Jim Carter

Jim Carter, Independence , MO

Life for this 1951 Chevrolet Model 5100 began at the GM assembly plant in Kansas City . Soon after, it was delivered to its new home at a small Chevrolet dealer in Lydon , Kansas . About this time it was also equipped with a new wrecker body (manufactured by W.T. Stringfellow and Co., Nashville , Tennessee ) and made ready for duties as a GM dealership tow truck.

This dealer use is probably why it has survived and remains as a solid example of an original style 1950’s tow truck. Whereas, most wreckers are used continually by tow companies, an auto dealership is more limited in the needs for moving vehicles. Usually they are only needed for bringing in customer’s cars for repairs. They are kept nice to give a good dealer image.

Possibly because of its good condition, it appears that the second and third owners also gave it more respect during its occasional use in towing. It was purchased in 1992 at a swap meet by Jim Carters Antique Truck Parts Co. and is currently their mascot. This rig is sometimes taken to antique auto shows as well as just cruising on a Saturday night. Its short wheelbase allows it to easily maneuver in traffic and park in a standard space.

She is referred to as the ‘Blue Hooker’ and can match the power of any 2 ton wrecker. She has and can ‘Hook’ the best.

1951 chevrolet wrecker blue hooker

1951 Chevrolet from The Mense Family

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Owner: The Mense Family

Here is a great example of a ground up restoration of a 1951 Chevrolet 3/4 ton. The project is being done by Line Creek Restorations in Northmoor, Missouri near Kansas City, 1-816-946-6000. When the project is finished, it will be a new truck!

The shop is doing this project at the request of the three sons of the owner. (It was actually bought new, by the grandfather, for the farm in 1951.) The completed project will be a gift from the three sons to their father who learned to drive on this ¾ ton. They hope to have it complete for their home town 4th of July parade in Lenzberg, IL. Few vehicles have stayed in the family for three generations.

This 1951 had normal abuse for a truck on the farm 50 years ago. Few repairs were done if it still was able to haul a load. On one occasion during a very rainy season, Mr. Mense was driving the truck to town. His wife was the passenger. The truck got off the concrete highway and the soft soil on the shoulder gave way. The little 1951 with it’s cargo laid over on it’s side. No passenger injuries! When it was pulled back on the road, it still ran excellent but always carried a damaged door and running board plus two flattened right fenders.

The enclosed photos show areas during disassembly. There is typical dirt, grease and rust build up during it’s over 55 years in Southern Illinois. All parts will be totally cleaned and checked for wear. It will be reassembled like an over sized model kit after the parts are restored or replaced.

Future additions to this article will show the ¾ ton as it begins being placed back together.

Photos by Dan Hall of Line Creek Restorations

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

Progress Addendum One

Progress on the total restoration of this 1951 Chevy continues as scheduled. The bare frame was recently returned from a local company that did the sand blasting and then given a professional black powder coating. This is the ‘back bone’ of the truck, so now assembly can begin. Also sand blasted and sprayed with black enamel are the leaf springs, rear axle housing, front suspension and radiator support. Each item looks equal or better than new. The correct 216 six cylinder has just returned from a rebuilder and now Line Creek Restorations is giving it some assembly and the proper gray engine enamel. The attached photos show several of these items as they are setting in the shop after restoration and await assembly.

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

Progress Addendum Two

Items restored at other locations are mostly back in the Line Creek Restoration Shop. Assembly now continues at a faster pace. The project is beginning to look like a truck!

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 Tail Light Bracket

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Beginning in 1951, the rear bumper became an option on both Chevrolet and GMC pickups. This required a change in the standard left tail light bracket. The tail light assembly was now unprotected without the bumper. GM created a new bracket design that brought the tail light slightly ahead of the rear edge of the stake pocket.

In this way the tail light was not hit when the pickup backed against a loading dock. Of course, when the truck came with the now optional rear bumper, the tail light bracket remained as earlier years.

The non rear bumper tail light bracket is not being reproduced. For the perfectionist, it will require some hunting to uncover one of these rare assemblies. Most restorers want the optional rear bumper and thus there is little demand for this forgotten bracket.

1951 tail light bracket 1

1947-1950 (above)

1951 tail light bracket 2

1951-1953 (above)

1951 tail light bracket 3

1947-1950 (above)

1951 tail light bracket 4

1951-1953 (above)

1951 tail light bracket 5

1947-1950 (above)

Proper 3100 Hood Side Emblem

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the Advance Design years no less than four different Chevrolet hood side emblems were used on 1/2 tons. Each of their two mounting pins are in the same place so the punched hood holes were unchanged during these years. All were chromed die cast even during the 1952-1953 Korean war chrome shortage.

The following pictures show the correct emblem for each of the years. Beware, some vendor’s catalogs do not list them correctly.

Note: Between mid-1949 through 1951, a separate small 3100 emblem was placed below the Chevrolet letter plate. Therefore, hoods during these years will have two additional factory punched holes. The longer Chevrolet emblem used between 1949-1952 are the same.

proper 3100 1

1949-1951 3100 Emblem (above)

proper 3100 2

1955 First Series (above)

proper 3100 3

1952 (above)

proper 3100 4

1953-1954 (above)

proper 3100 5

1947-1949 Thriftmaster (above)

1951-1953 Gauge Cluster Differences

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1951 1953 guage cluster 1

On first glance, most people assume that both Chevy and GMC gauge clusters are fully interchangeable and are the same except for perhaps the minor difference with Chevy oil gauges topping out at 30 psi versus GMC gauges maxing out at 60 psi. But that’s quite a bit short of what the actual differences were originally! There are actually no less than five distinct differences in the same year gauge clusters when taken from same size trucks. Below you will see two examples of late 1951 to 1953 gauge clusters; one on the left from a Chevy truck, and the one on the right from a GMC truck. Before you start jumping up and down about the tan background brown letter gauges in 1951, realize that the gauge clusters changed in late 1951 and then stayed brown background cream letters up through 1953. The first and most obvious difference is the oil gauge, but upon closer inspection you’ll find twelve distinct differences between them; six on each gauge cluster.

  1. GMC oil gauge reads 60 psi while the Chevy oil gauge tops out at 30 psi
  2. GMC used an Ampere gauge showing 50- | +50 where Chevy used a C | D Charge/Discharge style gauge
  3. The label under the electrical gauge on Chevy clusters says simply “BATTERY” while on the GMC it says “AMPERES”
  4. GMC temperature gauges maxed out at 220F where Chevy temperature gauges stop at 212F until 1953. In 1953 Chevrolet matched GMC with 220F
  5. The GMC fuel gauge was used for both big and small trucks, so it reads “FUEL” where the Chevy gauge reads “GASOLINE” since there were no Chevy diesel trucks at that time
  6. The Chevy gauges all have longer 2/3rds way needles than the GMC gauges with half-way needles

So the next time you’re shopping for gauges, these subtle differences may help you to better understand what you need whether you are driving a Chevy or a GMC.

Rob English

www.oldGMCtrucks.com

1951 Chevrolet

Saturday, August 1st, 2009

Owner: Jim Streeby

1951 chevrolet

I was volunteering for my church, working the graveyard security shift, at a fireworks tent. The 11pm-7am shift was an opportunity to visit with a couple of men from our church, share a few stories etc. We got to talking and I told my new friend I had been searching a long time for a specific, Chevy, truck;.After several awkward moments of complete silence, he looked at me and said, I know where one is, but I don’t think he’ll sell it! 4 weeks later My new friend Aubrey had traveled 7 hours west, to the far southwest corner of Kansas. He called me on his sell phone, was driving the truck, and excitedly told me how wonderfully preserved it was;’If you don’t buy it Jim I will’ he said. That was good enough for me. He even delivered it!

I bought this 1951 Chevy ½ ton in the summer of 2007. I travel the state of Nebraska and Kansas for a living and had called on or looked at many trucks ;so I was picky. This truck arrived in September of 2007, I immediately put new tires and brakes on it, tuned it up and drove it to a few cruise nights. In October my friends encouraged me to enter it at the Midwest National Truck Show. It took 1st place in Original, Un-restored Class. I brought it home and the next day began to completely disassemble the truck.

Over the next 21 months I completely became obsessed with the total frame off restoration. With the constant help of many friends I did a complete frame off restoration. This truck was exactly like the one my grandfather taught me to drive when I was 12 years old. I touched, cleaned, replaced or repaired every nut, bolt, spring, cotter key;.you get the picture;anything less would have a disservice to the impact he had on my life.

I had all the metal including the frame bead blasted. The frame was powdered coated and all other metal was prepped, etching, primered, and a professional paint job was done by a good friend who doesn’t wish to be named. The motor ran fine, but I took it all the way down to the block, replaced the necessary parts, installed hardened valves and made it burn unleaded gas.

The pictures enclosed tell the rest of the story;My goal was to preserve history;.I love this truck and because of my strong desire to do artfully anal retentive job, I have many people to thank. Ken McCarty was with me every step. His vast teaching ability and help was invaluable. My friend Rod Adams artfully crafted the bed wood, Jack Crawford and I installed the 3.55 ring and pinion gears. And last but not least, Mike Taylor and the rest of the staff at Jim Carters were invaluable sources of information and support. Thanks to all! Jim Streeby

1951 chevrolet 1951 chevrolet 1951 chevrolet

1951 chevrolet

1951 GMC

Sunday, February 1st, 2009

Owner: Tom Pryor

1951 gmc

This 1951 GMC advance design half ton is owned by Tom Pryor of Kansas City, Missouri. Found four years ago in Clinton Missouri it was originally an Iowa farm truck. The previous owners had started a very poor attempt at restoration, sanding the old paint with little body repair then applying primer, the truck then sat in the outside elements were surface rust took over on every panel of the truck. The wood bed was rotten, electrical non-existent and field mice had taken over the interior.

My friend and project mentor Rod Adams was the driving force behind the restoration, he has given up many Sundays over four years to help me get the truck in the shape as you see in the photo. Rod owns a 1951 Chevrolet advance design himself and is very familiar with repairing these collectible trucks and has owned many over the years. Most body panels were removed and sandblasted to remove rust and coats of old paint and primer, then we hand sanded the entire truck to prepare the body for Rust Bullet primer. Originally the truck was black, but I decided the Forester Green was a better choice bringing Ol Jimmy back to life. No doubt, Rod will not take on another novice, I think I have been a challenge for him but have learned the dos and don’ts of restoration.

The interior has been restored to original factory specs as well and looks wonderful. All in all it has been an incredible experience and I can’t wait to get to take it out on a long ride when nice weather returns in the spring. For right now it will find home covered in Rod’s airplane hanger on his farm.

Rod and I want to make wooden side rails for the bed. I’m still not sure what color they will be, wood stained or painted and distressed like the new bed. Rod is a true craftsman when it comes to woodworking, especially reproduction furniture ; but I digress … back to the truck. With his wood working skills Rod milled and constructed a new yellow pine bed which we painted black then distressed to make the bed look worn and camouflage future scuffs, then sealed with a wood protector. I’m also considering adding an exterior windshield sun visor but for now I’m content with her profile. The running boards also posed some concern/choices, either prepare and paint like factory or cover them with a protective bed liner non-skid coating on all sides. The coating won out and I’m so glad I don’t have to worry about nicks and scrapes, plus the underside is now protected from the road elements.

The other thing that needs completion is the installation of seat belts; they have been purchased but not installed so that will be an upcoming project. I just don’t feel safe driving any vehicle unless I’m strapped in — even if it’s just lap belts.

Old and new parts were purchased from Jim Carter’s; the sales staff Lisa, Jimmy and Julie were always helpful in finding me everything needed to complete the restoration. In the end the truck turned out more than I expected. Originally looking for a knock-a-round weekend driver, the GMC has surpassed my wildest dreams. I’m most grateful for Rod’s time and talent that has brought this project to completion.

1951 gmc 1951 gmc

1951 GMC

Tuesday, August 1st, 2006

Owner: Thomas Albers

1951 gmc pick up truck

This 1951 GMC is a family original. My father bought it new from the local GMC dealer in Fort Benton, Montana and has stayed with us ever since. For years this pickup was used to drive from town, to our farm and back daily.

In the mid 1960’s my father converted it to a farm service truck to haul fuel to the tractors and combines in the field. He mounted a PTO drive off the back and ran an air compressor and also mounted a second generator on the engine with a converter so he could run power equipment in the fields. My father was a very ingenious farmer and there was not much he could not do off this service pickup. This was the first vehicle that my brothers, sister and I learned to drive in the 1960s thanks to the patience of our mother and father. In 1990 my brother -in-law hauled the pickup to Miles City, Montana so I could begin a two year restore on it. The pickup had been sitting in a covered shed for years and was in very good shape with the exception of mice in the cab. The engine and complete drive train are original and I have done only minor repairs thanks to my father’s good maintenance habits on the pickup. I would like to point out that the color of the pickup is the original scheme and was matched to the firewall (that did not need to be painted). Then in the mid 1990’s I taught my son and daughter to drive in this same pickup by going out to the fairgrounds and letting them drive on the roads. During the restoration I counted on and bought a lot of parts from Jim Carter as well as getting some advice from time to time. They were invaluable to me and I thank them for helping save so many “never to be forgotten memories” for our family.

1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck

1951 gmc pick up truck

1951 Chevrolet 3100

Thursday, August 1st, 2002

Owner: Dave Hinegardner – Reno Nevada Billie Heaton

1951 chevrolet 3100 pick up truck

This 1951 Chevrolet 3100 has been in our family since my dad bought it new in 1951 in Wooster, Ohio. It has a 216 cu. in. motor, four speed transmission, original radio, that still plays, the original bill of sale and spec. sheet. My girl friend and I started restoring it in 1992. It took 5 years and was done outside because we had no garage. The truck is completely stock, except for the paint and upholstery. Every part was ordered through Jim Carter Antique Truck Parts. The hardest parts to find were the 6.50-16 snow tires. The truck is a daily driver and is entered every year in ‘Hot August Nights’ .. We also put it in shows and parades. I wanted to thank Jim Carter Antique Truck Parts employees for their effort in getting us all the parts to complete this truck project. All the parts we ordered were just like original and we sent nothing back. Working with a company like Jim Carter’s made the project a lot more enjoyable;..

Thank You

Dave Hinegardner & Billie Heaton
Reno, Nevada

1951 chevrolet 3100 pick up truck
1951 chevrolet 3100 pick up truck

1951 GMC

Thursday, November 1st, 2001

Owner: Paul McGarr Guelph, Ontario, Canada

1951 gmc pick up truck

Hello Jim: My name is Paul McGarr and I bought my “1951 GMC” in 1994. I always wanted one because my dad had a 50 Chevy 5 window when I was a youngster. Originally I wanted to buy a Chevy 5 window but could not find one in half decent shape. I should mention that I live in Guelph, Ontario and we have winter snow and road salt to deal with so there isn’t many good old trucks from this area. I did find one from Alberta and even though it wasn’t a Chevy, it looked almost identical except for the tailgate and front grille and parking lights. I wanted my Dad to help me restore it but, unfortunately he became ill and passed away before it was finished. He did get to see it about 75% finished and I made him drive it out my driveway. I’ll never forget the glow in his eyes. I finished it in his memory and always smile inside when I look at it because I can still see him in it, driving out my driveway as sick as he was, he even had a catheter in at the time. I am sending a picture of my truck for all to see. Keep on restoring those old advance design trucks.

Sincerely, Paul McGarr Guelph, Ontario, Canada

P.S. I almost forgot to mention I got a lot of new parts from Jim Carter’s as well as help and information over the phone and by fax. Thanks I couldn’t have done it without your expert and professional help.

1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck

1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck

1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck

1951 GMC

Friday, September 1st, 2000

Owner: Rob English

1951 gmc pick up truck

I bought my ‘1951 GMC in ‘1991 and like many people, eventually I found my way to Jim Carter’s shop door…or more correctly his catalog and mail order business. At that time, his catalog was just being updated which is still the case! It’s constantly being updated. I wish that I had all my old Jim Carter catalogs to go back and look at them because of what is now available versus what was not available from the catalog then. Trust me, the catalog is a LOT thicker now. He used to go from ‘1934-‘1959 in one catalog! Actually I think his first catalog was from ‘1934-‘1972.

My ‘1951 GMC 3/4 ton truck was a barn fresh low mile original vehicle that had less than 21,000 original miles on it when I bought it. It has a number of unique factory options like the canvas and wood bed with tin lining and fender mounted rear directional signals. I have never put the canvas back on the huckster bed because I was so proud of how the wood looked when finished natural but still plan to some day. It looks like an Advance Design Covered Wagon with the canvas on. I am thinking of getting a US Parks Service logo for the door if I put the canvas back as it looks like a forest truck with the canvas on.

This ‘1951 GMC came as a stock truck in Brewster Green with the following factory options: a fresh air heater, Pyrene Fire Extinguisher mounted in the cab corner behind the passenger’s head, huckster bed with canvas and galvanized tin lining, and 4 speed synchromesh transmission. The dealer added GMC air horns under the hood, signal stat rear only directional signals, Unity fog lights, and a Unity Spotlight. I added an original restored radio, step plates on the running boards, and a rear bumper. I got the radio, step plates, bumper, and 3/4 ton rear bumper brackets from Jim. I replaced my bumpers with stainless which is the ONLY way to go as far as I’m concerned. They are easy to maintain and will take some scuffs and buff out easily unlike chrome which is shot once scratched deeply. I think I paid $325 for the radio completely restored like new and that was about 7 or 8 years ago. Now the original ‘1947-‘1953 Chevy/GMC radios are few and far between.

Put my name at the top of the list of satisfied Carter customers. I bought (and continue to buy) virtually everything from Jim including all the rubber, a ‘1951 driver’s side door – one year door hard to find, left front fender, and too many other new, reproduction, and used parts to begin to list. A few years later I was back again. Jim was able to supply me with some hard to find parts when I was working on my ’51 GMC Suburban. I wanted to run the older (‘1930’s & 1940s) artillery style wheels on it but wanted to keep the original GMC clip style hubcaps and Jim had a full set of the artillery wheels that were NOS! I also got a 4 row radiator from him that worked GREAT with the automatic transmission cooler in it! Many of the Suburban parts are only available used and Jim was able to help with everything except a 3rd seat which I never did find.

I haven’t done too much to my ‘1951 3/4 ton Huckster since the beginning of ’95 but drive it and enjoy it. I sold the Suburban and have been thinking about trying to find a ‘1954 – 1955 1st series GMC one ton with a HydraMatic and DeLuxe cab as that is probably my all time favorite GMC pickup. I have had many fun miles in my GMC trucks which sport a lot of Jim’s parts.

I wish continued success to Jim and his business and I’ll do what I can to keep you going if I can find the right GMC!

Rob English

1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck

1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck 1951 gmc pick up truck

1951 gmc pick up truck